Community perspectives on research consent involving vulnerable children in Western Kenya

Rachel Vreeman, Eunice Kamaara, Allan Kamanda, David Ayuku, Winstone Nyandiko, Lukoye Atwoli, Samuel Ayaya, Peter Gisore, Michael Scanlon, Paula Braitstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

INVOLVING VULNERABLE PEDIATRIC populations in international research requires culturally appropriate ethical protections. We sought to use mabaraza, traditional East African community assemblies, to understand how a community in western Kenya viewed participation of children in health research and informed consent and assent processes. Results from 108 participants revealed generally positive attitudes towards involving vulnerable children in research, largely because they assumed children would directly benefit. Consent from parents or guardians was understood as necessary for participation while gaining child assent was not. They felt other caregivers, community leaders, and even community assemblies could participate in the consent process. Community members believed research involving orphans and street children could benefit these vulnerable populations, but would require special processes for consent.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)44-55
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2012

Fingerprint

Kenya
Research
community
Vulnerable Populations
Pediatrics
Homeless Youth
child benefit
Orphaned Children
participation
orphan
Informed Consent
Caregivers
Health
caregiver
parents
Parents
leader
health

Keywords

  • Community-based research
  • Ethics
  • Informed consent
  • Kenya
  • Pediatrics
  • Sub-Saharan Africa

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Communication
  • Social Psychology
  • Law

Cite this

Community perspectives on research consent involving vulnerable children in Western Kenya. / Vreeman, Rachel; Kamaara, Eunice; Kamanda, Allan; Ayuku, David; Nyandiko, Winstone; Atwoli, Lukoye; Ayaya, Samuel; Gisore, Peter; Scanlon, Michael; Braitstein, Paula.

In: Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics, Vol. 7, No. 4, 10.2012, p. 44-55.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vreeman, R, Kamaara, E, Kamanda, A, Ayuku, D, Nyandiko, W, Atwoli, L, Ayaya, S, Gisore, P, Scanlon, M & Braitstein, P 2012, 'Community perspectives on research consent involving vulnerable children in Western Kenya', Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics, vol. 7, no. 4, pp. 44-55. https://doi.org/10.1525/jer.2012.7.4.44
Vreeman, Rachel ; Kamaara, Eunice ; Kamanda, Allan ; Ayuku, David ; Nyandiko, Winstone ; Atwoli, Lukoye ; Ayaya, Samuel ; Gisore, Peter ; Scanlon, Michael ; Braitstein, Paula. / Community perspectives on research consent involving vulnerable children in Western Kenya. In: Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics. 2012 ; Vol. 7, No. 4. pp. 44-55.
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