Comparison of 360-degree versus traditional trabeculotomy in pediatric glaucoma

Maria E. Lim, Daniel Neely, Jingyun Wang, Kathryn Haider, Heather A. Smith, David Plager

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14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose To compare intraocular pressure (IOP) control of pediatric glaucoma patients undergoing traditional trabeculotomy (<360 degrees or partial) with those receiving 360-degree circumferential trabeculotomy. Methods The medical records of pediatric glaucoma patients receiving trabeculotomy at a single institution from 2000 to 2012were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into two groups: a traditional trabeculotomy group and 360-degree trabeculotomy group. IOP at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months' follow-up were compared within and each groups. Results A total of 77 eyes of 56 patients (age at surgery, 1.52 ± 2.68 years) in the traditional group and 14 eyes of 10 patients in the 360-degree group (age at surgery, 0.61 ± 0.42 years) were included. Mean baseline IOP was similar in both groups (traditional, 28.75 ± 8.80 mm Hg; 360-degree, 30.35 ± 6.04 mm Hg; t test; P = 0.43). Mean 1-year IOP was 17.05 ± 5.92 mm Hg in the traditional group and 11.0 ± 2.31 mm Hg in the 360-degree group. At 1-year, the surgical success rate was 58.44% in the traditional group and 85.71% in the 360-degree group; 32 eyes in the former and 2 eyes in the latter required another glaucoma procedure within 1 year for IOP control. For both groups, compared to baseline values, IOP decreased significantly with all postoperative measurements (paired t test, all P < 0.01). The 360-degree group had significantly lower IOP compared to the traditional group at 1-year (t test, P < 0.01). Conclusions Both 360-degree and traditional trabeculotomy significantly reduced IOP in children through 1 year's follow-up, although the former procedure shows better 1-year postoperative IOP control, with higher rate of surgical success.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)145-149
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of AAPOS
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

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Trabeculectomy
Intraocular Pressure
Glaucoma
Pediatrics
Medical Records
Age Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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Comparison of 360-degree versus traditional trabeculotomy in pediatric glaucoma. / Lim, Maria E.; Neely, Daniel; Wang, Jingyun; Haider, Kathryn; Smith, Heather A.; Plager, David.

In: Journal of AAPOS, Vol. 19, No. 2, 01.04.2015, p. 145-149.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Purpose To compare intraocular pressure (IOP) control of pediatric glaucoma patients undergoing traditional trabeculotomy (<360 degrees or partial) with those receiving 360-degree circumferential trabeculotomy. Methods The medical records of pediatric glaucoma patients receiving trabeculotomy at a single institution from 2000 to 2012were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into two groups: a traditional trabeculotomy group and 360-degree trabeculotomy group. IOP at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months' follow-up were compared within and each groups. Results A total of 77 eyes of 56 patients (age at surgery, 1.52 ± 2.68 years) in the traditional group and 14 eyes of 10 patients in the 360-degree group (age at surgery, 0.61 ± 0.42 years) were included. Mean baseline IOP was similar in both groups (traditional, 28.75 ± 8.80 mm Hg; 360-degree, 30.35 ± 6.04 mm Hg; t test; P = 0.43). Mean 1-year IOP was 17.05 ± 5.92 mm Hg in the traditional group and 11.0 ± 2.31 mm Hg in the 360-degree group. At 1-year, the surgical success rate was 58.44{\%} in the traditional group and 85.71{\%} in the 360-degree group; 32 eyes in the former and 2 eyes in the latter required another glaucoma procedure within 1 year for IOP control. For both groups, compared to baseline values, IOP decreased significantly with all postoperative measurements (paired t test, all P < 0.01). The 360-degree group had significantly lower IOP compared to the traditional group at 1-year (t test, P < 0.01). Conclusions Both 360-degree and traditional trabeculotomy significantly reduced IOP in children through 1 year's follow-up, although the former procedure shows better 1-year postoperative IOP control, with higher rate of surgical success.",
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AB - Purpose To compare intraocular pressure (IOP) control of pediatric glaucoma patients undergoing traditional trabeculotomy (<360 degrees or partial) with those receiving 360-degree circumferential trabeculotomy. Methods The medical records of pediatric glaucoma patients receiving trabeculotomy at a single institution from 2000 to 2012were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into two groups: a traditional trabeculotomy group and 360-degree trabeculotomy group. IOP at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months' follow-up were compared within and each groups. Results A total of 77 eyes of 56 patients (age at surgery, 1.52 ± 2.68 years) in the traditional group and 14 eyes of 10 patients in the 360-degree group (age at surgery, 0.61 ± 0.42 years) were included. Mean baseline IOP was similar in both groups (traditional, 28.75 ± 8.80 mm Hg; 360-degree, 30.35 ± 6.04 mm Hg; t test; P = 0.43). Mean 1-year IOP was 17.05 ± 5.92 mm Hg in the traditional group and 11.0 ± 2.31 mm Hg in the 360-degree group. At 1-year, the surgical success rate was 58.44% in the traditional group and 85.71% in the 360-degree group; 32 eyes in the former and 2 eyes in the latter required another glaucoma procedure within 1 year for IOP control. For both groups, compared to baseline values, IOP decreased significantly with all postoperative measurements (paired t test, all P < 0.01). The 360-degree group had significantly lower IOP compared to the traditional group at 1-year (t test, P < 0.01). Conclusions Both 360-degree and traditional trabeculotomy significantly reduced IOP in children through 1 year's follow-up, although the former procedure shows better 1-year postoperative IOP control, with higher rate of surgical success.

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