Comparison of hematopoietic progenitor cells in human umbilical cord blood collected from neonatal infants who are small and appropriate for gestational age

Hal Broxmeyer, K. A. Britton, N. L. Hague, H. L. Brown, Frederick Stehman, H. E. Broxmeyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Cord blood has been used for transplantation. The purpose of this study was to compare numbers of hematopoietic progenitors in cord blood collected from neonatal infants who are small for their gestational age and those who are normal. Study Design and Methods: Sixteen pregnant women diagnosed with intrauterine growth restriction were prospectively identified. Cord blood was collected at delivery. Fourteen cord blood samples were obtained from gestational age-matched, appropriately grown newborns. In vitro assays for hematopoietic progenitors were performed and results of the two compared. Comparisons were also made with numbers of hematopoietic progenitor cells previously found by this laboratory in samples collected with the possibility of use for transplantation. Results: Gestational age, the women's pregnancy and delivery histories, maternal risk factors for intrauterine growth restriction, maternal age, delivery method, umbilical cord blood gases, and 5-minute Apgar scores were similar in the two groups. Newborns who were small for their gestational age had significantly lower birth weights and longer stays in the neonatal intensive care unit with no evidence for viral infections in the immediate neonatal period. The mean number of progenitors per collection of cord blood in the small newborns was about half that per collection from appropriately grown newborns, but in most cases these differences were not significant in the two groups, and many numbers in the small newborns fell within the range associated with successfully engrafting cord blood collections. Conclusion: Hematopoietic progenitor cells in the small newborns may be adequate for transplantation purposes in many cases. Their possible use in this context should, however, involve careful consideration of the numbers of progenitors collected as well as of possible vital or other contamination.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)587-591
Number of pages5
JournalTransfusion
Volume35
Issue number7
StatePublished - 1995

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Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Fetal Blood
Gestational Age
Newborn Infant
Transplantation
Reproductive History
Apgar Score
Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Maternal Age
Virus Diseases
Growth
Birth Weight
Pregnant Women
Gases
Mothers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Hematology

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Comparison of hematopoietic progenitor cells in human umbilical cord blood collected from neonatal infants who are small and appropriate for gestational age. / Broxmeyer, Hal; Britton, K. A.; Hague, N. L.; Brown, H. L.; Stehman, Frederick; Broxmeyer, H. E.

In: Transfusion, Vol. 35, No. 7, 1995, p. 587-591.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Comparison of hematopoietic progenitor cells in human umbilical cord blood collected from neonatal infants who are small and appropriate for gestational age

AU - Broxmeyer, Hal

AU - Britton, K. A.

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AU - Stehman, Frederick

AU - Broxmeyer, H. E.

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N2 - Background: Cord blood has been used for transplantation. The purpose of this study was to compare numbers of hematopoietic progenitors in cord blood collected from neonatal infants who are small for their gestational age and those who are normal. Study Design and Methods: Sixteen pregnant women diagnosed with intrauterine growth restriction were prospectively identified. Cord blood was collected at delivery. Fourteen cord blood samples were obtained from gestational age-matched, appropriately grown newborns. In vitro assays for hematopoietic progenitors were performed and results of the two compared. Comparisons were also made with numbers of hematopoietic progenitor cells previously found by this laboratory in samples collected with the possibility of use for transplantation. Results: Gestational age, the women's pregnancy and delivery histories, maternal risk factors for intrauterine growth restriction, maternal age, delivery method, umbilical cord blood gases, and 5-minute Apgar scores were similar in the two groups. Newborns who were small for their gestational age had significantly lower birth weights and longer stays in the neonatal intensive care unit with no evidence for viral infections in the immediate neonatal period. The mean number of progenitors per collection of cord blood in the small newborns was about half that per collection from appropriately grown newborns, but in most cases these differences were not significant in the two groups, and many numbers in the small newborns fell within the range associated with successfully engrafting cord blood collections. Conclusion: Hematopoietic progenitor cells in the small newborns may be adequate for transplantation purposes in many cases. Their possible use in this context should, however, involve careful consideration of the numbers of progenitors collected as well as of possible vital or other contamination.

AB - Background: Cord blood has been used for transplantation. The purpose of this study was to compare numbers of hematopoietic progenitors in cord blood collected from neonatal infants who are small for their gestational age and those who are normal. Study Design and Methods: Sixteen pregnant women diagnosed with intrauterine growth restriction were prospectively identified. Cord blood was collected at delivery. Fourteen cord blood samples were obtained from gestational age-matched, appropriately grown newborns. In vitro assays for hematopoietic progenitors were performed and results of the two compared. Comparisons were also made with numbers of hematopoietic progenitor cells previously found by this laboratory in samples collected with the possibility of use for transplantation. Results: Gestational age, the women's pregnancy and delivery histories, maternal risk factors for intrauterine growth restriction, maternal age, delivery method, umbilical cord blood gases, and 5-minute Apgar scores were similar in the two groups. Newborns who were small for their gestational age had significantly lower birth weights and longer stays in the neonatal intensive care unit with no evidence for viral infections in the immediate neonatal period. The mean number of progenitors per collection of cord blood in the small newborns was about half that per collection from appropriately grown newborns, but in most cases these differences were not significant in the two groups, and many numbers in the small newborns fell within the range associated with successfully engrafting cord blood collections. Conclusion: Hematopoietic progenitor cells in the small newborns may be adequate for transplantation purposes in many cases. Their possible use in this context should, however, involve careful consideration of the numbers of progenitors collected as well as of possible vital or other contamination.

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