Comparison of light-activated surgical adhesive and suture techniques for vascular repair: An in vivo study

Eric C. Soller, Grant T. Hoffman, Jill N. Riley, Tonya J. Dickson, Pamela Rogers, Larry Solomon, Keith L. March, Karen M. McNally-Heintzelman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

An in vivo study was conducted to investigate the feasibility, mechanical function, and chronic biocompatibility of a new range of light-activated surgical adhesives for vascular anastomosis. Porcine carotid arteries (n=12) and femoral arteries (n=12) were exposed, and a 0.3 - 0.6cm longitudinal incision was made in the arterial walls. The vessels were divided equally into two groups. Vessels belonging to the first group were repaired using a surgical adhesive, composed of a poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffold doped with the traditional protein solder mix of serum albumin and indocyanine green dye mixed in deionized water. The adhesive was applied across the incision and denatured using an 805-nm diode laser. Vessels belonging to the second group formed part of a control study, and were repaired using conventional suturing techniques. Blood flow was restored to the vessels immediately after the procedure and the incision sites were checked for patency. The strength and hemostatic abilities of the new surgical adhesives were evaluated in the context of arterial pressure, persistence of hemostasis and presence of any inflammatory reaction after 3 days. The adhesive technique compared favorably with the suture technique. Repairs formed with the adhesive technique were achieved more rapidly than suturing, and acute leakage was observed less frequently. Repairs closed by suture did not burst, but leaked at pressures significantly below those of vessels closed with the adhesive material. Finally, the adhesive technique produced better histology than the suture technique, suggesting that it holds great promise as an alternative to suturing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
EditorsW.T.W. Riese, K.E. Bartels, L.S. Bass, K.W. Gregory
Pages229-236
Number of pages8
Volume4609
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002
EventLasers in Surgery: Advanced Characterization, Therapeutics, and Systems XII - San Jose, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 19 2002Jan 22 2002

Other

OtherLasers in Surgery: Advanced Characterization, Therapeutics, and Systems XII
CountryUnited States
CitySan Jose, CA
Period1/19/021/22/02

Fingerprint

adhesives
Adhesives
Repair
vessels
hemostatics
arteries
Histology
histology
Deionized water
biocompatibility
Scaffolds (biology)
blood flow
solders
albumins
Biocompatibility
serums
Soldering alloys
Semiconductor lasers
bursts
Blood

Keywords

  • Albumin protein solder
  • Biocompatibility
  • Diode laser
  • Hemostasis
  • Indocyanine green dye
  • Mechanical function
  • Polymer membrane

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Soller, E. C., Hoffman, G. T., Riley, J. N., Dickson, T. J., Rogers, P., Solomon, L., ... McNally-Heintzelman, K. M. (2002). Comparison of light-activated surgical adhesive and suture techniques for vascular repair: An in vivo study. In W. T. W. Riese, K. E. Bartels, L. S. Bass, & K. W. Gregory (Eds.), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 4609, pp. 229-236) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.432088

Comparison of light-activated surgical adhesive and suture techniques for vascular repair : An in vivo study. / Soller, Eric C.; Hoffman, Grant T.; Riley, Jill N.; Dickson, Tonya J.; Rogers, Pamela; Solomon, Larry; March, Keith L.; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. ed. / W.T.W. Riese; K.E. Bartels; L.S. Bass; K.W. Gregory. Vol. 4609 2002. p. 229-236.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Soller, EC, Hoffman, GT, Riley, JN, Dickson, TJ, Rogers, P, Solomon, L, March, KL & McNally-Heintzelman, KM 2002, Comparison of light-activated surgical adhesive and suture techniques for vascular repair: An in vivo study. in WTW Riese, KE Bartels, LS Bass & KW Gregory (eds), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. vol. 4609, pp. 229-236, Lasers in Surgery: Advanced Characterization, Therapeutics, and Systems XII, San Jose, CA, United States, 1/19/02. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.432088
Soller EC, Hoffman GT, Riley JN, Dickson TJ, Rogers P, Solomon L et al. Comparison of light-activated surgical adhesive and suture techniques for vascular repair: An in vivo study. In Riese WTW, Bartels KE, Bass LS, Gregory KW, editors, Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 4609. 2002. p. 229-236 https://doi.org/10.1117/12.432088
Soller, Eric C. ; Hoffman, Grant T. ; Riley, Jill N. ; Dickson, Tonya J. ; Rogers, Pamela ; Solomon, Larry ; March, Keith L. ; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M. / Comparison of light-activated surgical adhesive and suture techniques for vascular repair : An in vivo study. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. editor / W.T.W. Riese ; K.E. Bartels ; L.S. Bass ; K.W. Gregory. Vol. 4609 2002. pp. 229-236
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