Comparison of tailored interventions to increase mammography screening in nonadherent older women

Victoria Champion, Maltie Maraj, Siu Hui, Anthony J. Perkins, William Tierney, Usha Menon, Celette Sugg Skinner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

110 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Recent increases in mammography use have led to a decrease in mortality from breast cancer. Methods. Building on the Health Belief Model, the Transtheoretical Model, and past effectiveness of tailored interventions, we conducted a prospective randomized trial (n = 773) to test the efficacy on mammography adherence of tailored interventions delivered by five different methods, i.e., telephone counseling, in-person counseling, physician letter, and combinations of telephone with letter and in-person with letter. Results. All five interventions increased mammography adherence significantly relative to usual care (odds ratios, 1.93 to 3.55) at 6 months post intervention. The combination of in-person with physician letter was significantly more effective than telephone alone or letter alone. Women thinking about getting a mammogram at baseline were more likely to be adherent by 6 months; even those in usual care achieved 48% adherence compared with 50-70% in the intervention groups. In contrast, women not thinking about getting a mammogram needed the interventions to increase their adherence from 13% to over 30%. Conclusions. All five interventions were effective at increasing mammography adherence. Women not thinking about getting a mammogram were most likely to benefit from these tailored interventions while other women might need less intensive interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)150-158
Number of pages9
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2003

Fingerprint

Mammography
Telephone
Counseling
Physicians
Odds Ratio
Breast Neoplasms
Mortality
Health
Thinking

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Interventions
  • Mammography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Comparison of tailored interventions to increase mammography screening in nonadherent older women. / Champion, Victoria; Maraj, Maltie; Hui, Siu; Perkins, Anthony J.; Tierney, William; Menon, Usha; Skinner, Celette Sugg.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 36, No. 2, 01.02.2003, p. 150-158.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Champion, Victoria ; Maraj, Maltie ; Hui, Siu ; Perkins, Anthony J. ; Tierney, William ; Menon, Usha ; Skinner, Celette Sugg. / Comparison of tailored interventions to increase mammography screening in nonadherent older women. In: Preventive Medicine. 2003 ; Vol. 36, No. 2. pp. 150-158.
@article{0f4f344a4669498ebe2579f55fa250bf,
title = "Comparison of tailored interventions to increase mammography screening in nonadherent older women",
abstract = "Background. Recent increases in mammography use have led to a decrease in mortality from breast cancer. Methods. Building on the Health Belief Model, the Transtheoretical Model, and past effectiveness of tailored interventions, we conducted a prospective randomized trial (n = 773) to test the efficacy on mammography adherence of tailored interventions delivered by five different methods, i.e., telephone counseling, in-person counseling, physician letter, and combinations of telephone with letter and in-person with letter. Results. All five interventions increased mammography adherence significantly relative to usual care (odds ratios, 1.93 to 3.55) at 6 months post intervention. The combination of in-person with physician letter was significantly more effective than telephone alone or letter alone. Women thinking about getting a mammogram at baseline were more likely to be adherent by 6 months; even those in usual care achieved 48{\%} adherence compared with 50-70{\%} in the intervention groups. In contrast, women not thinking about getting a mammogram needed the interventions to increase their adherence from 13{\%} to over 30{\%}. Conclusions. All five interventions were effective at increasing mammography adherence. Women not thinking about getting a mammogram were most likely to benefit from these tailored interventions while other women might need less intensive interventions.",
keywords = "Breast cancer, Interventions, Mammography",
author = "Victoria Champion and Maltie Maraj and Siu Hui and Perkins, {Anthony J.} and William Tierney and Usha Menon and Skinner, {Celette Sugg}",
year = "2003",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0091-7435(02)00038-5",
language = "English",
volume = "36",
pages = "150--158",
journal = "Preventive Medicine",
issn = "0091-7435",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparison of tailored interventions to increase mammography screening in nonadherent older women

AU - Champion, Victoria

AU - Maraj, Maltie

AU - Hui, Siu

AU - Perkins, Anthony J.

AU - Tierney, William

AU - Menon, Usha

AU - Skinner, Celette Sugg

PY - 2003/2/1

Y1 - 2003/2/1

N2 - Background. Recent increases in mammography use have led to a decrease in mortality from breast cancer. Methods. Building on the Health Belief Model, the Transtheoretical Model, and past effectiveness of tailored interventions, we conducted a prospective randomized trial (n = 773) to test the efficacy on mammography adherence of tailored interventions delivered by five different methods, i.e., telephone counseling, in-person counseling, physician letter, and combinations of telephone with letter and in-person with letter. Results. All five interventions increased mammography adherence significantly relative to usual care (odds ratios, 1.93 to 3.55) at 6 months post intervention. The combination of in-person with physician letter was significantly more effective than telephone alone or letter alone. Women thinking about getting a mammogram at baseline were more likely to be adherent by 6 months; even those in usual care achieved 48% adherence compared with 50-70% in the intervention groups. In contrast, women not thinking about getting a mammogram needed the interventions to increase their adherence from 13% to over 30%. Conclusions. All five interventions were effective at increasing mammography adherence. Women not thinking about getting a mammogram were most likely to benefit from these tailored interventions while other women might need less intensive interventions.

AB - Background. Recent increases in mammography use have led to a decrease in mortality from breast cancer. Methods. Building on the Health Belief Model, the Transtheoretical Model, and past effectiveness of tailored interventions, we conducted a prospective randomized trial (n = 773) to test the efficacy on mammography adherence of tailored interventions delivered by five different methods, i.e., telephone counseling, in-person counseling, physician letter, and combinations of telephone with letter and in-person with letter. Results. All five interventions increased mammography adherence significantly relative to usual care (odds ratios, 1.93 to 3.55) at 6 months post intervention. The combination of in-person with physician letter was significantly more effective than telephone alone or letter alone. Women thinking about getting a mammogram at baseline were more likely to be adherent by 6 months; even those in usual care achieved 48% adherence compared with 50-70% in the intervention groups. In contrast, women not thinking about getting a mammogram needed the interventions to increase their adherence from 13% to over 30%. Conclusions. All five interventions were effective at increasing mammography adherence. Women not thinking about getting a mammogram were most likely to benefit from these tailored interventions while other women might need less intensive interventions.

KW - Breast cancer

KW - Interventions

KW - Mammography

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037325732&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0037325732&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0091-7435(02)00038-5

DO - 10.1016/S0091-7435(02)00038-5

M3 - Article

VL - 36

SP - 150

EP - 158

JO - Preventive Medicine

JF - Preventive Medicine

SN - 0091-7435

IS - 2

ER -