Comparison of the MTI Photoscreener and the Welch-Allyn SureSight™ autorefractor in a tertiary care center

David L. Rogers, Daniel Neely, Janice B. Chapman, David Plager, Derek T. Sprunger, Naval Sondhi, Gavin J. Roberts, Susan Ofner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Introduction: The MTI photoscreener (MTI) and the Welch-Allyn SureSight autorefractor are commonly used for preschool vision screening. We compared both of these methods on 100 consecutive patients in a prospective, randomized, masked, clinical trial conducted at a tertiary care center. Methods: One hundred patients between 1 and 6 years of age were included in the study. All participants underwent a comprehensive eye examination with cycloplegic refraction. Examination failure analysis was done on the SureSight data using the manufacturer's referral criteria, the Vision in Preschoolers study (VIP) 90% specificity criteria, the VIP 94% specificity criteria, and the referral criteria proposed by Rowatt and colleagues. Results: Data were successfully obtained on 76% of children using the SureSight and 96% with the MTI. The sensitivity and specificity of the SureSight to detect clinically significant amblyogenic factors using the manufacturer's criteria was 96.6 and 38.1%, using the VIP 90% criteria was 79.3 and 64.3%, using the VIP 94% criteria was 67.2 and 69.0%, and using criteria proposed by Rowatt and colleagues was 62.1 and 73.8%. The sensitivity and specificity of the MTI photoscreener was 94.8 and 88.1%, respectively. Conclusions: Using the manufacturer's referral criteria, the SureSight had a sensitivity equal to the MTI photoscreener; however, the specificity was low and over-referrals were anticipated. As specificity levels were increased, a substantial number of children with amblyogenic risk factors were not appropriately identified within our study population..{A figure is presented}.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)77-82
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of AAPOS
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2008

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Tertiary Care Centers
Referral and Consultation
Vision Screening
Mydriatics
Sensitivity and Specificity
Randomized Controlled Trials
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Comparison of the MTI Photoscreener and the Welch-Allyn SureSight™ autorefractor in a tertiary care center. / Rogers, David L.; Neely, Daniel; Chapman, Janice B.; Plager, David; Sprunger, Derek T.; Sondhi, Naval; Roberts, Gavin J.; Ofner, Susan.

In: Journal of AAPOS, Vol. 12, No. 1, 02.2008, p. 77-82.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rogers, David L. ; Neely, Daniel ; Chapman, Janice B. ; Plager, David ; Sprunger, Derek T. ; Sondhi, Naval ; Roberts, Gavin J. ; Ofner, Susan. / Comparison of the MTI Photoscreener and the Welch-Allyn SureSight™ autorefractor in a tertiary care center. In: Journal of AAPOS. 2008 ; Vol. 12, No. 1. pp. 77-82.
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