Comparison of the quality of life after nonsurgical radiofrequency energy tissue micro-remodeling in premenopausal and postmenopausal women with moderate-to-severe stress urinary incontinence

John P. Lenihan, Tina Tomsen, Michael Smith, Lee Learman, Robert Prins, Marilyn Laughead, Michael Collins, Audrey Curtis, James Fearl, Julian Parer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: This study was undertaken to determine the effect of menopause and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on incontinence quality of life (I-QOL) score improvement in women with moderate-to-severe stress urinary incontinence (SUI) after nonsurgical, transurethral radiofrequency energy (RF) tissue micro-remodeling. Study design: Retrospective review of prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial. Women with moderate-to-severe SUI were analyzed by menopausal status and HRT use for 10-point or greater I-QOL score improvement (an increase associated with subjective and objective SUI improvement). Results: RF micro-remodeling resulted in 81% of subjects achieving 10-point or greater I-QOL score improvement versus 49% of sham subjects at 12 months (P = .04). Outcomes did not differ statistically when premenopausal (85%), postmenopausal using HRT (70%), and postmenopausal not using HRT (71%) groups were compared. Conclusion: Menopausal status and HRT demonstrated no impact on the quality of life improvement experienced by women with moderate-to-severe SUI who underwent RF tissue micro-remodeling.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1995-1998
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume192
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2005

Keywords

  • Nonsurgical
  • Radiofrequency energy micro-remodeling
  • Stress urinary incontinence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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