Comparisons of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope variants in blood and genital fluids near the time of male-to-female transmission

Partners in Prevention HSV/HIV Transmission Study Team

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To better understand the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the genetic characteristics of blood and genital viruses from males were compared to those of the imputed founding virus population in their female partners. Initially serodiscordant heterosexual African couples with sequence-confirmed male-to-female HIV-1 transmission and blood and genital specimens collected near the time of transmission were studied. Single viral templates from blood plasma and genital tract RNA and DNA were sequenced across HIV-1 env gp160. Eight of 29 couples examined yielded viral sequences from both tissues. Analysis of these couples’ sequences demonstrated, with one exception, that the women’s founding viral populations arose from a single viral variant and were CCR5 tropic, even though CXCR4 variants were detected within four males. The median genetic distance of the imputed most recent common ancestor of the women’s founder viruses showed that they were closer to the semen viruses than to the blood viruses of their transmitting male partner, but this finding was biased by detection of a greater number of viral clades in the blood. Using multiple assays, the blood and genital viruses were consistently found to be compartmentalized in only two of eight men. No distinct amino acid signatures in the men’s viruses were found to link to the women’s founders, nor did the women’s env sequences have shorter variable loops or fewer N-linked glycosylation sites. The lack of selective factors, except for coreceptor tropism, is consistent with others’ findings in male-to-female and high-risk transmissions. The infrequent compartmentalization between the transmitters’ blood and semen viruses suggests that cell-free blood virus likely includes HIV-1 sequences representative of those of viruses in semen.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere01769-18
JournalJournal of virology
Volume93
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Human immunodeficiency virus 1
genitalia
HIV-1
Viruses
viruses
blood
Semen
semen
fluids
tropisms
Tropism
Heterosexuality
glycosylation
blood plasma
Glycosylation
Population
genetic distance
Sequence Analysis
Blood Cells
tropics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Insect Science
  • Virology

Cite this

Comparisons of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope variants in blood and genital fluids near the time of male-to-female transmission. / Partners in Prevention HSV/HIV Transmission Study Team.

In: Journal of virology, Vol. 93, No. 13, e01769-18, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{849a4ef87de74af69fc7ad6ad761f113,
title = "Comparisons of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope variants in blood and genital fluids near the time of male-to-female transmission",
abstract = "To better understand the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the genetic characteristics of blood and genital viruses from males were compared to those of the imputed founding virus population in their female partners. Initially serodiscordant heterosexual African couples with sequence-confirmed male-to-female HIV-1 transmission and blood and genital specimens collected near the time of transmission were studied. Single viral templates from blood plasma and genital tract RNA and DNA were sequenced across HIV-1 env gp160. Eight of 29 couples examined yielded viral sequences from both tissues. Analysis of these couples’ sequences demonstrated, with one exception, that the women’s founding viral populations arose from a single viral variant and were CCR5 tropic, even though CXCR4 variants were detected within four males. The median genetic distance of the imputed most recent common ancestor of the women’s founder viruses showed that they were closer to the semen viruses than to the blood viruses of their transmitting male partner, but this finding was biased by detection of a greater number of viral clades in the blood. Using multiple assays, the blood and genital viruses were consistently found to be compartmentalized in only two of eight men. No distinct amino acid signatures in the men’s viruses were found to link to the women’s founders, nor did the women’s env sequences have shorter variable loops or fewer N-linked glycosylation sites. The lack of selective factors, except for coreceptor tropism, is consistent with others’ findings in male-to-female and high-risk transmissions. The infrequent compartmentalization between the transmitters’ blood and semen viruses suggests that cell-free blood virus likely includes HIV-1 sequences representative of those of viruses in semen.",
author = "{Partners in Prevention HSV/HIV Transmission Study Team} and Williams-Wietzikoski, {Corey A.} and Campbell, {Mary S.} and Rachel Payant and Airin Lam and Hong Zhao and Hannah Huang and Anna Wald and Wendy Stevens and Glenda Gray and Carey Farquhar and Helen Rees and Connie Celum and Mullins, {James I.} and Lingappa, {Jairam R.} and Frenkel, {Lisa M.} and Baeten, {Jared M.} and Lawrence Corey and Coombs, {Robert W.} and Hughes, {James P.} and Amalia Magaret and McElrath, {M. Juliana} and Rhoda Morrow and David Coetzee and Kenneth Fife and Edwin Were and Max Essex and Joseph Makhema and Elly Katabira and Allan Ronald and Susan Allen and Kayitesi Kayitenkore and Etienne Karita and Elizabeth Bukusi and Craig Cohen and William Kanweka and Bellington Vwalika and Saidi Kapiga and Rachel Manongi and Grace John-Stewart and James Kiarie and Mubiana Inambao and Sinead Delany-Moretlwe and {De Bruyn}, Guy and James McIntyre and Mugo, {Nelly Rwamba}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1128/JVI.01769-18",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "93",
journal = "Journal of Virology",
issn = "0022-538X",
publisher = "American Society for Microbiology",
number = "13",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparisons of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope variants in blood and genital fluids near the time of male-to-female transmission

AU - Partners in Prevention HSV/HIV Transmission Study Team

AU - Williams-Wietzikoski, Corey A.

AU - Campbell, Mary S.

AU - Payant, Rachel

AU - Lam, Airin

AU - Zhao, Hong

AU - Huang, Hannah

AU - Wald, Anna

AU - Stevens, Wendy

AU - Gray, Glenda

AU - Farquhar, Carey

AU - Rees, Helen

AU - Celum, Connie

AU - Mullins, James I.

AU - Lingappa, Jairam R.

AU - Frenkel, Lisa M.

AU - Baeten, Jared M.

AU - Corey, Lawrence

AU - Coombs, Robert W.

AU - Hughes, James P.

AU - Magaret, Amalia

AU - McElrath, M. Juliana

AU - Morrow, Rhoda

AU - Coetzee, David

AU - Fife, Kenneth

AU - Were, Edwin

AU - Essex, Max

AU - Makhema, Joseph

AU - Katabira, Elly

AU - Ronald, Allan

AU - Allen, Susan

AU - Kayitenkore, Kayitesi

AU - Karita, Etienne

AU - Bukusi, Elizabeth

AU - Cohen, Craig

AU - Kanweka, William

AU - Vwalika, Bellington

AU - Kapiga, Saidi

AU - Manongi, Rachel

AU - John-Stewart, Grace

AU - Kiarie, James

AU - Inambao, Mubiana

AU - Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead

AU - De Bruyn, Guy

AU - McIntyre, James

AU - Mugo, Nelly Rwamba

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - To better understand the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the genetic characteristics of blood and genital viruses from males were compared to those of the imputed founding virus population in their female partners. Initially serodiscordant heterosexual African couples with sequence-confirmed male-to-female HIV-1 transmission and blood and genital specimens collected near the time of transmission were studied. Single viral templates from blood plasma and genital tract RNA and DNA were sequenced across HIV-1 env gp160. Eight of 29 couples examined yielded viral sequences from both tissues. Analysis of these couples’ sequences demonstrated, with one exception, that the women’s founding viral populations arose from a single viral variant and were CCR5 tropic, even though CXCR4 variants were detected within four males. The median genetic distance of the imputed most recent common ancestor of the women’s founder viruses showed that they were closer to the semen viruses than to the blood viruses of their transmitting male partner, but this finding was biased by detection of a greater number of viral clades in the blood. Using multiple assays, the blood and genital viruses were consistently found to be compartmentalized in only two of eight men. No distinct amino acid signatures in the men’s viruses were found to link to the women’s founders, nor did the women’s env sequences have shorter variable loops or fewer N-linked glycosylation sites. The lack of selective factors, except for coreceptor tropism, is consistent with others’ findings in male-to-female and high-risk transmissions. The infrequent compartmentalization between the transmitters’ blood and semen viruses suggests that cell-free blood virus likely includes HIV-1 sequences representative of those of viruses in semen.

AB - To better understand the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the genetic characteristics of blood and genital viruses from males were compared to those of the imputed founding virus population in their female partners. Initially serodiscordant heterosexual African couples with sequence-confirmed male-to-female HIV-1 transmission and blood and genital specimens collected near the time of transmission were studied. Single viral templates from blood plasma and genital tract RNA and DNA were sequenced across HIV-1 env gp160. Eight of 29 couples examined yielded viral sequences from both tissues. Analysis of these couples’ sequences demonstrated, with one exception, that the women’s founding viral populations arose from a single viral variant and were CCR5 tropic, even though CXCR4 variants were detected within four males. The median genetic distance of the imputed most recent common ancestor of the women’s founder viruses showed that they were closer to the semen viruses than to the blood viruses of their transmitting male partner, but this finding was biased by detection of a greater number of viral clades in the blood. Using multiple assays, the blood and genital viruses were consistently found to be compartmentalized in only two of eight men. No distinct amino acid signatures in the men’s viruses were found to link to the women’s founders, nor did the women’s env sequences have shorter variable loops or fewer N-linked glycosylation sites. The lack of selective factors, except for coreceptor tropism, is consistent with others’ findings in male-to-female and high-risk transmissions. The infrequent compartmentalization between the transmitters’ blood and semen viruses suggests that cell-free blood virus likely includes HIV-1 sequences representative of those of viruses in semen.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85068173478&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85068173478&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1128/JVI.01769-18

DO - 10.1128/JVI.01769-18

M3 - Article

VL - 93

JO - Journal of Virology

JF - Journal of Virology

SN - 0022-538X

IS - 13

M1 - e01769-18

ER -