Complications after a 5-year experience with laparoscopic donor nephrectomy

The Indiana University experience

Chandru Sundaram, G. L. Martin, A. Guise, J. Bernie, V. Bargman, M. Milgrom, A. Shalhav, M. Govani, W. Goggins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy (LDN) is becoming the standard of care for living donor nephrectomy. However, questions have been raised about the safety of LDN for the donor and about the potentially increased rates for ureteral complications experienced by the recipient. In this report, the authors review their 5-year experience with 253 living laparoscopic donor nephrectomies. Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed for 253 laparoscopic live donors. Graft function and survival were compared using recipient postoperative creatinine values up to 12 months. Results: The overall rate of complications in the investigated series was 10.3%. There were seven intraoperative complications (2.8%), three of which required open conversion. There were 19 postoperative complications (7.5%), three of which required reexploration for bleeding. The majority of complications were minor including 62% grade 1, 8% grade 2, 31% grade 3, and no grade 4 or 5 complications. There were no intraoperative complications in the right-sided donor group. There was a 5% complication rate for patients with a body mass index (BMI) exceeding 25. The findings showed that 11.2% of the recipients had slow graft function, and 4.4% had delayed graft function. Less than 1% of the recipients experienced ureteral stricture requiring permanent stent placement or reoperation. Overall, there was a 2% graft loss rate. Conclusions: The findings show a low rate of intraoperative and postoperative complications, most of which were minor complications. There was an increase in operative time and hospital stay in the right-sided group, but no increase in complication rate. There was no significant difference in outcome or complication rate for the overweight patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)724-728
Number of pages5
JournalSurgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2007

Fingerprint

Nephrectomy
Tissue Donors
Intraoperative Complications
Living Donors
Delayed Graft Function
Transplants
Graft Survival
Standard of Care
Operative Time
Reoperation
Stents
Length of Stay
Creatinine
Pathologic Constriction
Body Mass Index
Hemorrhage
Safety

Keywords

  • Complications
  • Laparoscopy
  • Nephrectomy
  • Renal transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Complications after a 5-year experience with laparoscopic donor nephrectomy : The Indiana University experience. / Sundaram, Chandru; Martin, G. L.; Guise, A.; Bernie, J.; Bargman, V.; Milgrom, M.; Shalhav, A.; Govani, M.; Goggins, W.

In: Surgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques, Vol. 21, No. 5, 05.2007, p. 724-728.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sundaram, Chandru ; Martin, G. L. ; Guise, A. ; Bernie, J. ; Bargman, V. ; Milgrom, M. ; Shalhav, A. ; Govani, M. ; Goggins, W. / Complications after a 5-year experience with laparoscopic donor nephrectomy : The Indiana University experience. In: Surgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques. 2007 ; Vol. 21, No. 5. pp. 724-728.
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AU - Bargman, V.

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AU - Shalhav, A.

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