Computers in surgical residencies

E. G. Chekan, Thomas Hayward, F. J. Brody, G. P. Purcell, K. Hayward, T. N. Pappas, W. S. Eubanks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Computerized data management, or information technology (IT), seems less apparent in surgical residencies as compared with the systems being developed on college campuses. Through the use of a telephone survey of residency program coordinators, we sought to evaluate the depth of IT integration into surgical residencies compared with integration into undergraduate education. Thirty surgical residency programs were randomly selected for a telephone interview with the program coordinator. A total of six questions were asked regarding the use of computers in their program. The results of the survey indicate that the majority of surgical residency programs rank below undergraduate institutions with regard to the integration of IT into their educational system. Considerable efforts are needed to improve the surgical resident's access to IT. The following three-phased outline is a suggestion for integrating IT into a surgical residency program: Phase I, department-based data management; Phase II, network foundations; and Phase III, integrated networks. Computer technology is rapidly evolving and changing the practice of surgery. Residency programs should prepare their trainees for the use of IT. Integration of computerized data management into surgical residencies will improve not only resident education and effectiveness, but also translate into more responsible patient care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)391-396
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Surgery
Volume55
Issue number9
StatePublished - Nov 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Internship and Residency
information technology
Technology
management
resident
Education
telephone interview
Information Management
Access to Information
trainee
patient care
educational system
surgery
telephone
Telephone
education
Patient Care
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Chekan, E. G., Hayward, T., Brody, F. J., Purcell, G. P., Hayward, K., Pappas, T. N., & Eubanks, W. S. (1998). Computers in surgical residencies. Current Surgery, 55(9), 391-396.

Computers in surgical residencies. / Chekan, E. G.; Hayward, Thomas; Brody, F. J.; Purcell, G. P.; Hayward, K.; Pappas, T. N.; Eubanks, W. S.

In: Current Surgery, Vol. 55, No. 9, 11.1998, p. 391-396.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chekan, EG, Hayward, T, Brody, FJ, Purcell, GP, Hayward, K, Pappas, TN & Eubanks, WS 1998, 'Computers in surgical residencies', Current Surgery, vol. 55, no. 9, pp. 391-396.
Chekan EG, Hayward T, Brody FJ, Purcell GP, Hayward K, Pappas TN et al. Computers in surgical residencies. Current Surgery. 1998 Nov;55(9):391-396.
Chekan, E. G. ; Hayward, Thomas ; Brody, F. J. ; Purcell, G. P. ; Hayward, K. ; Pappas, T. N. ; Eubanks, W. S. / Computers in surgical residencies. In: Current Surgery. 1998 ; Vol. 55, No. 9. pp. 391-396.
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