Continuing medical education and the professional standards review organizations

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The history of continuing medical education (CME) activities in the United States originates in the early years of this century. CME programs have increased markedly in recent decades, but these activities have come to be viewed from many perspectives as inadequate. Recently, the Professional Standards Review Organization (PSRO's) have been proposed as a 'solution' to the problems of CME. PSRO's may provide useful data to CME programs and could serve as mechanisms for evaluating these activities. Features of medical care problems which identify them as suitable subjects for CME activities using PSRO data are presented and discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationJohns Hopkins Medical Journal
Pages37-40
Number of pages4
Volume139
Edition1
StatePublished - 1976
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Professional Review Organizations
Continuing Medical Education
History

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Inui, T. (1976). Continuing medical education and the professional standards review organizations. In Johns Hopkins Medical Journal (1 ed., Vol. 139, pp. 37-40)

Continuing medical education and the professional standards review organizations. / Inui, Thomas.

Johns Hopkins Medical Journal. Vol. 139 1. ed. 1976. p. 37-40.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Inui, T 1976, Continuing medical education and the professional standards review organizations. in Johns Hopkins Medical Journal. 1 edn, vol. 139, pp. 37-40.
Inui T. Continuing medical education and the professional standards review organizations. In Johns Hopkins Medical Journal. 1 ed. Vol. 139. 1976. p. 37-40
Inui, Thomas. / Continuing medical education and the professional standards review organizations. Johns Hopkins Medical Journal. Vol. 139 1. ed. 1976. pp. 37-40
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