Contrasting Histopathology and Crystal Deposits in Kidneys of Idiopathic Stone Formers Who Produce Hydroxy Apatite, Brushite, or Calcium Oxalate Stones

Andrew Evan, James E. Lingeman, Elaine M. Worcester, Andre J. Sommer, Carrie Phillips, James Williams, Fredric L. Coe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Our previous work has shown that stone formers who form calcium phosphate (CaP) stones that contain any brushite (BRSF) have a distinctive renal histopathology and surgical anatomy when compared with idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers (ICSF). Here we report on another group of idiopathic CaP stone formers, those forming stone containing primarily hydroxyapatite, in order to clarify in what ways their pathology differs from BRSF and ICSF. Eleven hydroxyapatite stone formers (HASF) (2 males, 9 females) were studied using intra-operative digital photography and biopsy of papillary and cortical regions to measure tissue changes associated with stone formation. Our main finding is that HASF and BRSF differ significantly from each other and that both differ greatly from ICSF. Both BRSF and ICSF patients have significant levels of Randall's plaque compared with HASF. Intra-tubular deposit number is greater in HASF than BRSF and nonexistent in ICSF while deposit size is smaller in HASF than BRSF. Cortical pathology is distinctly greater in BRSF than HASF. Four attached stones were observed in HASF, three in 25 BRSF and 5-10 per ICSF patient. HASF and BRSF differ clinically in that both have higher average urine pH, supersaturation of CaP, and calcium excretion than ICSF. Our work suggests that HASF and BRSF are two distinct and separate diseases and both differ greatly from ICSF. Anat Rec, 297:731-748, 2014.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)731-748
Number of pages18
JournalAnatomical Record
Volume297
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Apatites
Calcium Oxalate
hydroxyapatite
calcium oxalate
Kidney Calculi
histopathology
Durapatite
oxalate
apatite
crystals
calcium
kidneys
crystal
calcium phosphates
dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate
stone
Pathology
Photography
digital images
phosphate

Keywords

  • CaP stone formers
  • Surgical anatomy
  • Ultrastructure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy
  • Histology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Biotechnology

Cite this

Contrasting Histopathology and Crystal Deposits in Kidneys of Idiopathic Stone Formers Who Produce Hydroxy Apatite, Brushite, or Calcium Oxalate Stones. / Evan, Andrew; Lingeman, James E.; Worcester, Elaine M.; Sommer, Andre J.; Phillips, Carrie; Williams, James; Coe, Fredric L.

In: Anatomical Record, Vol. 297, No. 4, 2014, p. 731-748.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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