Contribution of low-molecular-weight compounds to the fecal excretion of carbohydrate energy in premature infants

C. Lawrence Kien, Edward A. Liechty, Martha D. Mullett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It was hypothesized that low-molecular-weight products of carbohydrate fermentation would contribute only a small percentage to the total fecal excretion of nonfat, nonnitrogenous energy (carbohydrate energy) in premature infants. Infants born at 28-32 weeks' gestation who were 2-4 weeks of age were randomized to receive a formula with lactose as the sole carbohydrate (n = 7) or the same formula with 50% of the carbohydrate as glucose polymer (n = 8). The percent contribution (X̄ ± SD) to total carbohydrate energy of sugars (glucose, galactose, lactose, glucose polymer), short-chain fatty acids (acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate, valerate, and isovalerate), and d- and l-lactate was 9.4% ± 2.9% for the 15 subjects and was not significantly different between groups. The percent contribution of all four sugars was 5.8% ± 1.7% and did not differ between the two groups. Doubling the lactose intake resulted in significant increases in fecal excretion (kilocalories per kilogram per day) of acetate (77% increase; P = 0.03), total short-chain fatty acids (54%; P = 0.04), and galactose (188%; P = 0.03). These data suggest that as much as 90% of fecal carbohydrate energy may be in the form of large-molecular-weight compounds, presumably bacterial in origin.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)165-174
Number of pages10
JournalGastroenterology
Volume99
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1990

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Premature Infants
Molecular Weight
Carbohydrates
Lactose
Glucans
Volatile Fatty Acids
Galactose
Acetates
Isobutyrates
Valerates
Butyrates
Propionates
Fermentation
Lactic Acid
Glucose
Pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Contribution of low-molecular-weight compounds to the fecal excretion of carbohydrate energy in premature infants. / Kien, C. Lawrence; Liechty, Edward A.; Mullett, Martha D.

In: Gastroenterology, Vol. 99, No. 1, 1990, p. 165-174.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kien, C. Lawrence ; Liechty, Edward A. ; Mullett, Martha D. / Contribution of low-molecular-weight compounds to the fecal excretion of carbohydrate energy in premature infants. In: Gastroenterology. 1990 ; Vol. 99, No. 1. pp. 165-174.
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