Controlled clinical trial of canine therapy versus usual care to reduce patient anxiety in the emergency department

Jeffrey Kline, Michelle A. Fisher, Katherine L. Pettit, Courtney T. Linville, Alan M. Beck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective Test if therapy dogs reduce anxiety in emergency department (ED) patients. Methods In this controlled clinical trial (NCT03471429), medically stable, adult patients were approached if the physician believed that the patient had “moderate or greater anxiety.” Patients were allocated on a 1:1 ratio to either 15 min exposure to a certified therapy dog and handler (dog), or usual care (control). Patient reported anxiety, pain and depression were assessed using a 0–10 scale (10 = worst). Primary outcome was change in anxiety from baseline (T0) to 30 min and 90 min after exposure to dog or control (T1 and T2 respectively); secondary outcomes were pain, depression and frequency of pain medication. Results Among 93 patients willing to participate in research, 7 had aversions to dogs, leaving 86 (92%) were willing to see a dog six others met exclusion criteria, leaving 40 patients allocated to each group (dog or control). Median and mean baseline anxiety, pain and depression scores were similar between groups. With dog exposure, median anxiety decreased significantly from T0 to T1: 6 (IQR 4–9.75) to T1: 2 (0–6) compared with 6 (4–8) to 6 (2.5–8) in controls (P<0.001, for T1, Mann-Whitney U and unpaired t-test). Dog exposure was associated with significantly lower anxiety at T2 and a significant overall treatment effect on two-way repeated measures ANOVA for anxiety, pain and depression. After exposure, 1/40 in the dog group needed pain medication, versus 7/40 in controls (P = 0.056, Fisher’s exact test). Conclusions Exposure to therapy dogs plus handlers significantly reduced anxiety in ED patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0209232
JournalPLoS One
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Controlled Clinical Trials
anxiety
Canidae
Hospital Emergency Service
clinical trials
Anxiety
Dogs
therapeutics
dogs
pain
therapy dogs
Pain
Therapeutics
Depression
Analysis of variance (ANOVA)
drug therapy
Implosive Therapy
physicians
analysis of variance
testing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

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Controlled clinical trial of canine therapy versus usual care to reduce patient anxiety in the emergency department. / Kline, Jeffrey; Fisher, Michelle A.; Pettit, Katherine L.; Linville, Courtney T.; Beck, Alan M.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 14, No. 1, e0209232, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kline, Jeffrey ; Fisher, Michelle A. ; Pettit, Katherine L. ; Linville, Courtney T. ; Beck, Alan M. / Controlled clinical trial of canine therapy versus usual care to reduce patient anxiety in the emergency department. In: PLoS One. 2019 ; Vol. 14, No. 1.
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