Convergent Functional Genomics of bipolar disorder: From animal model pharmacogenomics to human genetics and biomarkers

H. Le-Niculescu, M. J. McFarland, S. Mamidipalli, C. A. Ogden, R. Kuczenski, S. M. Kurian, D. R. Salomon, Ming T. Tsuang, J. I. Nurnberger, A. B. Niculescu

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Progress in understanding the genetic and neurobiological basis of bipolar disorder(s) has come from both human studies and animal model studies. Until recently, the lack of concerted integration between the two approaches has been hindering the pace of discovery, or more exactly, constituted a missed opportunity to accelerate our understanding of this complex and heterogeneous group of disorders. Our group has helped overcome this "lost in translation" barrier by developing an approach called convergent functional genomics (CFG). The approach integrates animal model gene expression data with human genetic linkage/association data, as well as human tissue (postmortem brain, blood) data. This Bayesian strategy for cross-validating findings extracts meaning from large datasets, and prioritizes candidate genes, pathways and mechanisms for subsequent targeted, hypothesis-driven research. The CFG approach may also be particularly useful for identification of blood biomarkers of the illness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)897-903
Number of pages7
JournalNeuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Volume31
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 27 2007

Fingerprint

Pharmacogenetics
Medical Genetics
Genomics
Bipolar Disorder
Animal Models
Biomarkers
Genetic Linkage
Gene Expression
Brain
Research
Genes
Datasets

Keywords

  • Animal model
  • Biomarkers
  • Bipolar
  • Blood
  • Brain
  • Convergent functional genomics
  • Genes
  • Microarray

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Convergent Functional Genomics of bipolar disorder : From animal model pharmacogenomics to human genetics and biomarkers. / Le-Niculescu, H.; McFarland, M. J.; Mamidipalli, S.; Ogden, C. A.; Kuczenski, R.; Kurian, S. M.; Salomon, D. R.; Tsuang, Ming T.; Nurnberger, J. I.; Niculescu, A. B.

In: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, Vol. 31, No. 6, 27.08.2007, p. 897-903.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Le-Niculescu, H. ; McFarland, M. J. ; Mamidipalli, S. ; Ogden, C. A. ; Kuczenski, R. ; Kurian, S. M. ; Salomon, D. R. ; Tsuang, Ming T. ; Nurnberger, J. I. ; Niculescu, A. B. / Convergent Functional Genomics of bipolar disorder : From animal model pharmacogenomics to human genetics and biomarkers. In: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews. 2007 ; Vol. 31, No. 6. pp. 897-903.
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