Corpus callosotomy: A quantitative study of the extent of resection, seizure control, and neuropsychological outcome

A. N. Mamelak, Nicholas Barbaro, J. A. Walker, K. D. Laxer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Corpus callosotomy is valuable for controlling medically intractable generalized seizures in appropriate patients, but postoperative development of language disorders, neuropsychological impairment, and motor dysfunction have all been noted. The extent of callosum resection has been implicated as a possible determinant of outcome, but this hypothesis has not been formally tested. Analysis of the records of all patients who underwent corpus callosotomy at the University of California, San Francisco, from 1986 to 1991 showed that, of 15 patients who underwent anterior or complete callosotomy, seven were entirely or nearly seizure-free, four had at least a 50% reduction in seizure frequency, and four had no change. To determine callosal size and extent of callosotomy, preoperative and postoperative magnetic resonance images were measured with computer-based planimetry. Seizure outcome was not significantly associated with preoperative callosal size or extent of callosotomy. Intelligence quotient scores did not change significantly after callosotomy. No severe neuropsychological deficits developed after anterior or complete callosotomy, even in patients with mixed cerebral dominance or bilateral language representation. These results indicate that division of the anterior one-half to two-thirds of the corpus callosum is nearly as effective as more extensive anterior sectioning or complete callosotomy in reducing drop-attack and generalized tonic-clonic seizures in appropriate patients, and that the extent of callosotomy is not an important factor on outcome when at least 50% to 65% of the callosum is divided. Mixed cerebral dominance and other unusual patterns of language and memory organization do not appear to increase the postoperative risk for neuropsychological deficits, regardless of the extent of anterior section.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)688-695
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume79
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Seizures
Corpus Callosum
Cerebral Dominance
Language
Language Development Disorders
San Francisco
Syncope
Intelligence
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

Keywords

  • cerebral dominance
  • corpus callosotomy
  • neuropsychological testing
  • seizure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Corpus callosotomy : A quantitative study of the extent of resection, seizure control, and neuropsychological outcome. / Mamelak, A. N.; Barbaro, Nicholas; Walker, J. A.; Laxer, K. D.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery, Vol. 79, No. 5, 1993, p. 688-695.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mamelak, A. N. ; Barbaro, Nicholas ; Walker, J. A. ; Laxer, K. D. / Corpus callosotomy : A quantitative study of the extent of resection, seizure control, and neuropsychological outcome. In: Journal of Neurosurgery. 1993 ; Vol. 79, No. 5. pp. 688-695.
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