Cross-cultural studies in Alzheimer's disease.

B. O. Osuntokun, Hugh Hendrie, A. O. Ogunniyi, Kathleen Hall, U. G. Lekwauwa, H. M. Brittain, J. A. Norton, A. B. Oyediran, N. Pillay, D. D. Rodgers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The search for risk factors for Alzheimer's disease would be greatly enhanced by identification of populations with significantly different prevalence rates, particularly if these populations consisted of ethnic groups now living in different environments and cultures. Evidence is presented that two such groups are worthy of further study: subjects of African origin living in Africa and in the West and Native Americans living on and off reserves.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)352-357
Number of pages6
JournalEthnicity and Disease
Volume2
Issue number4
StatePublished - Sep 1992
Externally publishedYes

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Alzheimer Disease
Western Africa
North American Indians
Ethnic Groups
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Osuntokun, B. O., Hendrie, H., Ogunniyi, A. O., Hall, K., Lekwauwa, U. G., Brittain, H. M., ... Rodgers, D. D. (1992). Cross-cultural studies in Alzheimer's disease. Ethnicity and Disease, 2(4), 352-357.

Cross-cultural studies in Alzheimer's disease. / Osuntokun, B. O.; Hendrie, Hugh; Ogunniyi, A. O.; Hall, Kathleen; Lekwauwa, U. G.; Brittain, H. M.; Norton, J. A.; Oyediran, A. B.; Pillay, N.; Rodgers, D. D.

In: Ethnicity and Disease, Vol. 2, No. 4, 09.1992, p. 352-357.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Osuntokun, BO, Hendrie, H, Ogunniyi, AO, Hall, K, Lekwauwa, UG, Brittain, HM, Norton, JA, Oyediran, AB, Pillay, N & Rodgers, DD 1992, 'Cross-cultural studies in Alzheimer's disease.', Ethnicity and Disease, vol. 2, no. 4, pp. 352-357.
Osuntokun BO, Hendrie H, Ogunniyi AO, Hall K, Lekwauwa UG, Brittain HM et al. Cross-cultural studies in Alzheimer's disease. Ethnicity and Disease. 1992 Sep;2(4):352-357.
Osuntokun, B. O. ; Hendrie, Hugh ; Ogunniyi, A. O. ; Hall, Kathleen ; Lekwauwa, U. G. ; Brittain, H. M. ; Norton, J. A. ; Oyediran, A. B. ; Pillay, N. ; Rodgers, D. D. / Cross-cultural studies in Alzheimer's disease. In: Ethnicity and Disease. 1992 ; Vol. 2, No. 4. pp. 352-357.
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