Curing metastatic testicular cancer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

266 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Our initial studies with cisplatin + vinblastine + bleomycin began 27 years ago in 1974, changing the cure rate for disseminated disease from 5 to 60%. Subsequently, through random prospective clinical trials, we have modified the treatment regimen to reduce both the duration and dosages of the chemotherapy drugs. Cisplatin + etoposide was first used at Indiana University as salvage chemotherapy in 1978, representing the first time that a solid tumor had been cured with second-line chemotherapy. We next did a clinical trial comparing bleomycin + etoposide + cisplatin (BEP) to cisplatin + vinblastine + bleomycin. The BEP regimen was proven to have less toxicity and a higher cure rate and therefore, since 1984, has been standard chemotherapy. More recent studies have evaluated the use of lesser chemotherapy to maintain the same cure rate for patients with good-prognosis disease. Standard therapy for these patients is either three courses of BEP or four courses of EP, and over 90% of these patients will be cured of their disease. Patients who are not cured with their initial BEP chemotherapy are usually treated with salvage chemotherapy. Approximately 50% of these testicular cancer patients will subsequently be cured with salvage chemotherapy with tandem transplant of high-dose chemotherapy with peripheral stem cell rescue. Testicular cancer has become a model for a curable neoplasm. In the early 1970s, metastatic testicular cancer was associated with only 5% survival. Today, with modern chemotherapy and surgery techniques, 80% of patients will survive their disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4592-4595
Number of pages4
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume99
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2 2002

Fingerprint

Testicular Neoplasms
Bleomycin
Cisplatin
Drug Therapy
Etoposide
Vinblastine
Clinical Trials
Neoplasms
Transplants
Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Curing metastatic testicular cancer. / Einhorn, Lawrence H.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 99, No. 7, 02.04.2002, p. 4592-4595.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e15293ab8e4c45d1a8f9a262b6d5db02,
title = "Curing metastatic testicular cancer",
abstract = "Our initial studies with cisplatin + vinblastine + bleomycin began 27 years ago in 1974, changing the cure rate for disseminated disease from 5 to 60{\%}. Subsequently, through random prospective clinical trials, we have modified the treatment regimen to reduce both the duration and dosages of the chemotherapy drugs. Cisplatin + etoposide was first used at Indiana University as salvage chemotherapy in 1978, representing the first time that a solid tumor had been cured with second-line chemotherapy. We next did a clinical trial comparing bleomycin + etoposide + cisplatin (BEP) to cisplatin + vinblastine + bleomycin. The BEP regimen was proven to have less toxicity and a higher cure rate and therefore, since 1984, has been standard chemotherapy. More recent studies have evaluated the use of lesser chemotherapy to maintain the same cure rate for patients with good-prognosis disease. Standard therapy for these patients is either three courses of BEP or four courses of EP, and over 90{\%} of these patients will be cured of their disease. Patients who are not cured with their initial BEP chemotherapy are usually treated with salvage chemotherapy. Approximately 50{\%} of these testicular cancer patients will subsequently be cured with salvage chemotherapy with tandem transplant of high-dose chemotherapy with peripheral stem cell rescue. Testicular cancer has become a model for a curable neoplasm. In the early 1970s, metastatic testicular cancer was associated with only 5{\%} survival. Today, with modern chemotherapy and surgery techniques, 80{\%} of patients will survive their disease.",
author = "Einhorn, {Lawrence H.}",
year = "2002",
month = "4",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1073/pnas.072067999",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "99",
pages = "4592--4595",
journal = "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America",
issn = "0027-8424",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Curing metastatic testicular cancer

AU - Einhorn, Lawrence

PY - 2002/4/2

Y1 - 2002/4/2

N2 - Our initial studies with cisplatin + vinblastine + bleomycin began 27 years ago in 1974, changing the cure rate for disseminated disease from 5 to 60%. Subsequently, through random prospective clinical trials, we have modified the treatment regimen to reduce both the duration and dosages of the chemotherapy drugs. Cisplatin + etoposide was first used at Indiana University as salvage chemotherapy in 1978, representing the first time that a solid tumor had been cured with second-line chemotherapy. We next did a clinical trial comparing bleomycin + etoposide + cisplatin (BEP) to cisplatin + vinblastine + bleomycin. The BEP regimen was proven to have less toxicity and a higher cure rate and therefore, since 1984, has been standard chemotherapy. More recent studies have evaluated the use of lesser chemotherapy to maintain the same cure rate for patients with good-prognosis disease. Standard therapy for these patients is either three courses of BEP or four courses of EP, and over 90% of these patients will be cured of their disease. Patients who are not cured with their initial BEP chemotherapy are usually treated with salvage chemotherapy. Approximately 50% of these testicular cancer patients will subsequently be cured with salvage chemotherapy with tandem transplant of high-dose chemotherapy with peripheral stem cell rescue. Testicular cancer has become a model for a curable neoplasm. In the early 1970s, metastatic testicular cancer was associated with only 5% survival. Today, with modern chemotherapy and surgery techniques, 80% of patients will survive their disease.

AB - Our initial studies with cisplatin + vinblastine + bleomycin began 27 years ago in 1974, changing the cure rate for disseminated disease from 5 to 60%. Subsequently, through random prospective clinical trials, we have modified the treatment regimen to reduce both the duration and dosages of the chemotherapy drugs. Cisplatin + etoposide was first used at Indiana University as salvage chemotherapy in 1978, representing the first time that a solid tumor had been cured with second-line chemotherapy. We next did a clinical trial comparing bleomycin + etoposide + cisplatin (BEP) to cisplatin + vinblastine + bleomycin. The BEP regimen was proven to have less toxicity and a higher cure rate and therefore, since 1984, has been standard chemotherapy. More recent studies have evaluated the use of lesser chemotherapy to maintain the same cure rate for patients with good-prognosis disease. Standard therapy for these patients is either three courses of BEP or four courses of EP, and over 90% of these patients will be cured of their disease. Patients who are not cured with their initial BEP chemotherapy are usually treated with salvage chemotherapy. Approximately 50% of these testicular cancer patients will subsequently be cured with salvage chemotherapy with tandem transplant of high-dose chemotherapy with peripheral stem cell rescue. Testicular cancer has become a model for a curable neoplasm. In the early 1970s, metastatic testicular cancer was associated with only 5% survival. Today, with modern chemotherapy and surgery techniques, 80% of patients will survive their disease.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037007094&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0037007094&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1073/pnas.072067999

DO - 10.1073/pnas.072067999

M3 - Article

C2 - 11904381

AN - SCOPUS:0037007094

VL - 99

SP - 4592

EP - 4595

JO - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

JF - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

SN - 0027-8424

IS - 7

ER -