Current blood pressure selfmanagement

A qualitative study

Arlene A. Schmid, Teresa M. Datnush, Laurie Plue, Usha Subramanian, Tamilyn Bakus, Linda Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Blood pressure (BP) self-management is advocated to manage hypertension and reduce the risk of a future stroke. The purpose of this study was to identify BP self-management strategies used by individuals who had sustained a stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). As part of a mixed-methods study, we conducted six focus groups and achieved saturation with 16 stroke survivors and 12 TIA survivors. Each participant completed a questionnaire regarding current BP management. We analyzed and coded qualitative transcripts from the focus groups and found four emergent themes that were supported by questionnaire results. The four self-management themes include: (1) external support for BP self-management is helpful; (2) BP self-management strategies include medication adherence, routine development, and BP monitoring; (3) BP risk factor management involves diet, exercise, and stress reduction; and (4) taking advantage of the "teachable moment" may be advantageous for behavior change to self-manage BP. This research provides key elements for the development of a successful BP self-management program.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)223-229
Number of pages7
JournalRehabilitation Nursing
Volume34
Issue number6
StatePublished - Nov 2009

Fingerprint

Self Care
Blood Pressure
Stroke
Transient Ischemic Attack
Focus Groups
Survivors
Medication Adherence
Risk Management
Exercise
Diet
Hypertension
Research

Keywords

  • Blood pressure self-management
  • Hypertension self-management
  • Mixed methods
  • Stroke prevention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Rehabilitation
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Schmid, A. A., Datnush, T. M., Plue, L., Subramanian, U., Bakus, T., & Williams, L. (2009). Current blood pressure selfmanagement: A qualitative study. Rehabilitation Nursing, 34(6), 223-229.

Current blood pressure selfmanagement : A qualitative study. / Schmid, Arlene A.; Datnush, Teresa M.; Plue, Laurie; Subramanian, Usha; Bakus, Tamilyn; Williams, Linda.

In: Rehabilitation Nursing, Vol. 34, No. 6, 11.2009, p. 223-229.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schmid, AA, Datnush, TM, Plue, L, Subramanian, U, Bakus, T & Williams, L 2009, 'Current blood pressure selfmanagement: A qualitative study', Rehabilitation Nursing, vol. 34, no. 6, pp. 223-229.
Schmid AA, Datnush TM, Plue L, Subramanian U, Bakus T, Williams L. Current blood pressure selfmanagement: A qualitative study. Rehabilitation Nursing. 2009 Nov;34(6):223-229.
Schmid, Arlene A. ; Datnush, Teresa M. ; Plue, Laurie ; Subramanian, Usha ; Bakus, Tamilyn ; Williams, Linda. / Current blood pressure selfmanagement : A qualitative study. In: Rehabilitation Nursing. 2009 ; Vol. 34, No. 6. pp. 223-229.
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