Dairy products do not lead to alterations in body weight or fat mass in young women in a 1-y intervention

Carolyn W. Gunther, Pamela A. Legowski, Roseann M. Lyle, George P. McCabe, Marianne S. Eagan, Munro Peacock, Dorothy Teegarden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Previous results suggested that increased intake of dairy calcium is associated with reduced weight and fat mass. Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether long-term increases in consumption of dairy calcium alter body weight and fat mass in young, healthy women. Design: We used a randomized, 1-y intervention for dairy calcium. Subjects were 155 young (aged 18-30 y), healthy, normal-weight women with intake of dietary calcium < 800 mg/d and energy intake ≤ 2200 kcal/d. Women were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: 1) control: continue established dietary intake; 2) medium dairy: substitute dairy products to achieve intake of calcium of ≈ 1000-1100 mg/d and maintain isocaloric intake; 3) high dairy: substitute dairy products to achieve intake of calcium of 1300-1400 mg/d and maintain isocaloric intake. The main outcome measures were 1-y changes in body weight (in kg) and fat mass (in kg). One hundred thirty-five women completed the trial. Results: Mean intakes of calcium during the intervention were 742.4 ± 321.5, 1026.4 ± 311.3, and 1131.29 ± 337.2 mg/d for the control, medium-dairy, and high-dairy groups, respectively (P < 0.0001). No significant differences were observed in the mean 1-y change in body weight between the control, medium-dairy, and high-dairy groups (0.8 ± 2.8, 0.7 ± 3.0, and 1.5 ± 4.1 kg, respectively; P = 0.45). No significant differences were observed in the mean 1-y change in fat mass between the control, medium-dairy, and high-dairy groups (-0.5 ± 2.5,0.3 ± 2.7, and 0.5 ± 3.5 kg, respectively; P = 0.26). Conclusion: Increased intake of dairy products does not alter body weight or fat mass in young, healthy women over 1 y.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)751-756
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume81
Issue number4
StatePublished - 2005

Fingerprint

Dairy Products
body fat
dairy products
Adipose Tissue
dairies
Body Weight
Calcium
body weight
calcium
dairy consumption
Body Weight Changes
Fats
Weights and Measures
Dietary Calcium
food intake
Energy Intake
body weight changes
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
lipids
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Body weight
  • Calcium
  • Dairy
  • Fat mass
  • Intervention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Gunther, C. W., Legowski, P. A., Lyle, R. M., McCabe, G. P., Eagan, M. S., Peacock, M., & Teegarden, D. (2005). Dairy products do not lead to alterations in body weight or fat mass in young women in a 1-y intervention. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 81(4), 751-756.

Dairy products do not lead to alterations in body weight or fat mass in young women in a 1-y intervention. / Gunther, Carolyn W.; Legowski, Pamela A.; Lyle, Roseann M.; McCabe, George P.; Eagan, Marianne S.; Peacock, Munro; Teegarden, Dorothy.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 81, No. 4, 2005, p. 751-756.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gunther, CW, Legowski, PA, Lyle, RM, McCabe, GP, Eagan, MS, Peacock, M & Teegarden, D 2005, 'Dairy products do not lead to alterations in body weight or fat mass in young women in a 1-y intervention', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 81, no. 4, pp. 751-756.
Gunther, Carolyn W. ; Legowski, Pamela A. ; Lyle, Roseann M. ; McCabe, George P. ; Eagan, Marianne S. ; Peacock, Munro ; Teegarden, Dorothy. / Dairy products do not lead to alterations in body weight or fat mass in young women in a 1-y intervention. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2005 ; Vol. 81, No. 4. pp. 751-756.
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abstract = "Background: Previous results suggested that increased intake of dairy calcium is associated with reduced weight and fat mass. Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether long-term increases in consumption of dairy calcium alter body weight and fat mass in young, healthy women. Design: We used a randomized, 1-y intervention for dairy calcium. Subjects were 155 young (aged 18-30 y), healthy, normal-weight women with intake of dietary calcium < 800 mg/d and energy intake ≤ 2200 kcal/d. Women were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: 1) control: continue established dietary intake; 2) medium dairy: substitute dairy products to achieve intake of calcium of ≈ 1000-1100 mg/d and maintain isocaloric intake; 3) high dairy: substitute dairy products to achieve intake of calcium of 1300-1400 mg/d and maintain isocaloric intake. The main outcome measures were 1-y changes in body weight (in kg) and fat mass (in kg). One hundred thirty-five women completed the trial. Results: Mean intakes of calcium during the intervention were 742.4 ± 321.5, 1026.4 ± 311.3, and 1131.29 ± 337.2 mg/d for the control, medium-dairy, and high-dairy groups, respectively (P < 0.0001). No significant differences were observed in the mean 1-y change in body weight between the control, medium-dairy, and high-dairy groups (0.8 ± 2.8, 0.7 ± 3.0, and 1.5 ± 4.1 kg, respectively; P = 0.45). No significant differences were observed in the mean 1-y change in fat mass between the control, medium-dairy, and high-dairy groups (-0.5 ± 2.5,0.3 ± 2.7, and 0.5 ± 3.5 kg, respectively; P = 0.26). Conclusion: Increased intake of dairy products does not alter body weight or fat mass in young, healthy women over 1 y.",
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