Data for drugs available through low-cost prescription drug programs are available through pharmacy benefit manager and claims data

Vivienne J. Zhu, Anne Belsito, Wanzhu Tu, J. M. Overhage

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Observational data are increasingly being used for pharmacoepidemiological, health services and clinical effectiveness research. Since pharmacies first introduced low-cost prescription programs (LCPP), researchers have worried that data about the medications provided through these programs might not be available in observational data derived from administrative sources, such as payer claims or pharmacy benefit management (PBM) company transactions.Method: We used data from the Indiana Network for Patient Care to estimate the proportion of patients with type 2 diabetes to whom an oral hypoglycemic agent was dispensed. Based on these estimates, we compared the proportions of patients who received medications from chains that do and do not offer an LCPP, the proportion trend over time based on claims data from a single payer, and to proportions estimated from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS).Results: We found that the proportion of patients with type 2 diabetes who received oral hypoglycemic medications did not vary based on whether the chain that dispensed the drug offered an LCPP or over time. Additionally, the rates were comparable to those estimated from MEPS.Conclusion: Researchers can be reassured that data for medications available through LCPPs continue to be available through administrative data sources.

Original languageEnglish
Article number12
JournalBMC Clinical Pharmacology
Volume12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 22 2012

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Prescription Drugs
Prescriptions
Health Expenditures
Hypoglycemic Agents
Costs and Cost Analysis
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Research Personnel
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Pharmacies
Information Storage and Retrieval
Health Services
Patient Care
Research
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Claims data
  • Low-cost prescription program
  • Oral antihyperglycemic agents
  • Pharmacy benefit manager

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Data for drugs available through low-cost prescription drug programs are available through pharmacy benefit manager and claims data. / Zhu, Vivienne J.; Belsito, Anne; Tu, Wanzhu; Overhage, J. M.

In: BMC Clinical Pharmacology, Vol. 12, 12, 22.06.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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