Decorin mimic inhibits vascular smooth muscle proliferation and migration

Rebecca A. Scott, John E. Paderi, Michael Sturek, Alyssa Panitch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Over the past 10 years, the number of percutaneous coronary intervention procedures performed in the United States increased by 33%; however, restenosis, which inhibits complete functional recovery of the vessel wall, complicates this procedure. A wide range of anti-restenotic therapeutics have been developed, although many elicit non-specific effects that compromise vessel healing. Drawing inspiration from biologically-relevant molecules, our lab developed a mimic of the natural proteoglycan decorin, termed DS-SILY, which can mask exposed collagen and thereby effectively decrease platelet activation, thus contributing to suppression of vascular intimal hyperplasia. Here, we characterize the effects of DS-SILY on both proliferative and quiescent human SMCs to evaluate the potential impact of DS-SILY-SMC interaction on restenosis, and further characterize in vivo platelet interactions. DS-SILY decreased proliferative SMC proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in vitro in a concentration dependent manner as compared to untreated controls. The addition of DS-SILY to in vitro SMC cultures decreased SMC migration and protein synthesis by 95% and 37%, respectively. Furthermore, DS-SILY decreased platelet activation, as well as reduced neointimal hyperplasia by 60%, in vivo using Ossabaw swine. These results indicate that DS-SILY demonstrates multiple biological activities that may all synergistically contribute to an improved treatment paradigm for balloon angioplasty.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere82456
JournalPLoS One
Volume8
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 22 2013

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Decorin
platelet activation
Platelet Activation
Platelets
Vascular Smooth Muscle
hyperplasia
blood vessels
smooth muscle
Hyperplasia
Muscle
Tunica Intima
Balloon Angioplasty
proteoglycans
Proteoglycans
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Masks
Chemical activation
in vitro culture
Blood Vessels
collagen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Decorin mimic inhibits vascular smooth muscle proliferation and migration. / Scott, Rebecca A.; Paderi, John E.; Sturek, Michael; Panitch, Alyssa.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 8, No. 11, e82456, 22.11.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Scott, Rebecca A. ; Paderi, John E. ; Sturek, Michael ; Panitch, Alyssa. / Decorin mimic inhibits vascular smooth muscle proliferation and migration. In: PLoS One. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 11.
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