Decreased serum amyloid β1-42 autoantibody levels in Alzheimer's disease, determined by a newly developed immuno-precipitation assay with radiolabeled amyloid β1-42 peptide

Sylvia Brettschneider, Nils G. Morgenthaler, Stefan J. Teipel, Christina Fischer-Schulz, Katharina Bürger, Richard Dodel, Yansheng Du, Hans Jürgen Möller, Andreas Bergmann, Harald Hampel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Autoantibodies against amyloid β (Aβ) peptide found in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) also occur naturally in the general population independently of the cognitive status. Methods: We compared serum Aβ1-42 autoantibody levels (Aβ1-42-AL) of 96 AD patients and 30 healthy elderly control subjects (HC), assessing their diagnostic value for AD with a newly developed immunoprecipitation assay with radiolabeled Aβ1-42 peptide. Results: We found a highly significant decrease of Aβ1-42-AL in AD patients (p = .001) independently of age, cognitive status, and apolipoprotein Eε4 carrier status. Amyloid β1-42 autoantibody levels were correlated with gender in AD, with a higher level occurring in women. When Aβ 1-42 autoantibody sensitivity (specificity) was set >80%, specificity (sensitivity) was below 50% to correctly allocate patients and healthy control subjects. Conclusions: Our data indicate a potentially pathophysiologic decrease of serum Aβ1-42 antibodies in AD. Amyloid β1-42 antibodies in the serum alone, however, seem not to be useful as a diagnostic marker of AD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)813-816
Number of pages4
JournalBiological psychiatry
Volume57
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2005

Keywords

  • Aβ autoantibodies
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Bioassay
  • Biomarkers
  • Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)
  • Diagnosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biological Psychiatry

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Decreased serum amyloid β<sub>1-42</sub> autoantibody levels in Alzheimer's disease, determined by a newly developed immuno-precipitation assay with radiolabeled amyloid β<sub>1-42</sub> peptide'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Brettschneider, S., Morgenthaler, N. G., Teipel, S. J., Fischer-Schulz, C., Bürger, K., Dodel, R., Du, Y., Möller, H. J., Bergmann, A., & Hampel, H. (2005). Decreased serum amyloid β1-42 autoantibody levels in Alzheimer's disease, determined by a newly developed immuno-precipitation assay with radiolabeled amyloid β1-42 peptide. Biological psychiatry, 57(7), 813-816. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2004.12.008