Defining the role of surgery for primary gastrointestinal tract melanoma

Michael C. Cheung, Eduardo A. Perez, Manuel A. Molina, Xiaoling Jin, Juan C. Gutierrez, Dido Franceschi, Alan S. Livingstone, Leonidas Koniaris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective of the study was to determine the outcomes for primary gastrointestinal melanomas (PGIM). The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database (1973-2004) was queried. Overall, 659 cases of PGIM were identified. The annual incidence of PGIM was approximately 0.47 cases per million in 2000. Overall median survival time was 17 months. Tumors were identified in the oral-nasopharynx (32.8%), anal canal (31.4%), rectum (22.2%), esophagus (5.9%), stomach (2.7%), small bowel (2.3%), gallbladder (1.4%), and large bowel (0.9%). Univariate analysis demonstrated age, tumor location, stage, surgery, and lymph node status were significant predictors of improved survival. MST has not been reached for tumors located in the large bowel, while tumors located in the stomach demonstrated the shortest median survival (5 months). Improvement in MST was observed for those patients undergoing surgical resection. The presence of lymph node involvement conferred a poorer prognosis. Multivariate analysis of the cohort identified that location, advanced tumor stage, failure to undertake surgical resection, positive lymph node status, and age were all independent predictors of poorer outcome. PGIM occurs most often in the oral-nasopharynx and anal canal. Surgical extirpation is the only identifiable treatment modality that significantly improves survival.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)731-738
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Gastrointestinal Surgery
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Gastrointestinal Tract
Melanoma
Survival
Nasopharynx
Lymph Nodes
Anal Canal
Neoplasms
Stomach
Gallbladder
Rectum
Esophagus
Epidemiology
Multivariate Analysis
Databases
Incidence
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Gastrointestinal melanoma
  • Metastatic melanoma
  • Outcomes
  • SEER

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Cheung, M. C., Perez, E. A., Molina, M. A., Jin, X., Gutierrez, J. C., Franceschi, D., ... Koniaris, L. (2008). Defining the role of surgery for primary gastrointestinal tract melanoma. Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, 12(4), 731-738. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11605-007-0417-3

Defining the role of surgery for primary gastrointestinal tract melanoma. / Cheung, Michael C.; Perez, Eduardo A.; Molina, Manuel A.; Jin, Xiaoling; Gutierrez, Juan C.; Franceschi, Dido; Livingstone, Alan S.; Koniaris, Leonidas.

In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Vol. 12, No. 4, 04.2008, p. 731-738.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cheung, MC, Perez, EA, Molina, MA, Jin, X, Gutierrez, JC, Franceschi, D, Livingstone, AS & Koniaris, L 2008, 'Defining the role of surgery for primary gastrointestinal tract melanoma', Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 731-738. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11605-007-0417-3
Cheung MC, Perez EA, Molina MA, Jin X, Gutierrez JC, Franceschi D et al. Defining the role of surgery for primary gastrointestinal tract melanoma. Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery. 2008 Apr;12(4):731-738. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11605-007-0417-3
Cheung, Michael C. ; Perez, Eduardo A. ; Molina, Manuel A. ; Jin, Xiaoling ; Gutierrez, Juan C. ; Franceschi, Dido ; Livingstone, Alan S. ; Koniaris, Leonidas. / Defining the role of surgery for primary gastrointestinal tract melanoma. In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery. 2008 ; Vol. 12, No. 4. pp. 731-738.
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