Delayed central nervous system superficial siderosis following brachial plexus avulsion injury. Report of three cases.

Aaron Cohen-Gadol, William E. Krauss, Robert J. Spinner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chronic subarachnoid hemorrhage may cause deposition of hemosiderin on the leptomeninges and subpial layers of the neuraxis, leading to superficial siderosis (SS). The symptoms and signs of SS are progressive and fatal. Exploration of potential sites responsible for intrathecal bleeding and subsequent hemosiderin deposition may prevent disease progression. A source of hemorrhage including dural pathological entities, tumors, and vascular lesions has been previously identified in as many as 50% of patients with SS. In this report, the authors present three patients in whom central nervous system SS developed decades after brachial plexus avulsion injury. They believe that the traumatic dural diverticula in these cases may be a potential source of bleeding. A better understanding of the pathophysiology of SS is important to develop more suitable therapies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalNeurosurgical Focus
Volume16
Issue number5
StatePublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Siderosis
Brachial Plexus
Central Nervous System
Wounds and Injuries
Hemosiderin
Hemorrhage
Diverticulum
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
Signs and Symptoms
Blood Vessels
Disease Progression
Neoplasms

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Delayed central nervous system superficial siderosis following brachial plexus avulsion injury. Report of three cases. / Cohen-Gadol, Aaron; Krauss, William E.; Spinner, Robert J.

In: Neurosurgical Focus, Vol. 16, No. 5, 2004.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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