Depression and physical illness among elderly general medical clinic patients

W. A. Kukull, T. D. Koepsell, Thomas Inui, S. Borson, J. Okimoto, M. A. Raskind, J. L. Gale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

79 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study we conducted a resurvey at 33 months of elderly general medical clinic outpatients previously classified as depressed or not using the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale. Resurvey results and review of medical records permitted characterization of the point prevalences of depression at the time of the initial and follow-up surveys, and identification of physical illness factors associated with depression. The point prevalences of depression were approximately equal (20%), although only about 10% were depressed at both occasions. Among the initially nondepressed, the number of new physical diagnoses during follow-up was the best predictor of depression at retest. Other factors associated with depression at one or both occasions were: alcohol abuse, obstructive pulmonary disease, and a relatively greater number of medical diagnoses. Thus, among elderly outpatients, depression appears common with roughly equal rates of remission and incidence; also, new medical illness may precipitate depression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)153-162
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Affective Disorders
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1986

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Depression
Obstructive Lung Diseases
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Alcoholism
Medical Records
Outpatients
Incidence

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Elderly
  • Epidemiology
  • Physical illness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Kukull, W. A., Koepsell, T. D., Inui, T. S., Borson, S., Okimoto, J., Raskind, M. A., & Gale, J. L. (1986). Depression and physical illness among elderly general medical clinic patients. Journal of Affective Disorders, 10(2), 153-162. https://doi.org/10.1016/0165-0327(86)90037-6

Depression and physical illness among elderly general medical clinic patients. / Kukull, W. A.; Koepsell, T. D.; Inui, T. S.; Borson, S.; Okimoto, J.; Raskind, M. A.; Gale, J. L.

In: Journal of Affective Disorders, Vol. 10, No. 2, 01.01.1986, p. 153-162.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kukull, WA, Koepsell, TD, Inui, TS, Borson, S, Okimoto, J, Raskind, MA & Gale, JL 1986, 'Depression and physical illness among elderly general medical clinic patients', Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 153-162. https://doi.org/10.1016/0165-0327(86)90037-6
Kukull, W. A. ; Koepsell, T. D. ; Inui, T. S. ; Borson, S. ; Okimoto, J. ; Raskind, M. A. ; Gale, J. L. / Depression and physical illness among elderly general medical clinic patients. In: Journal of Affective Disorders. 1986 ; Vol. 10, No. 2. pp. 153-162.
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