Depression and poverty among African American women at risk for type 2 diabetes

Mary de Groot, Wendy Auslander, James Herbert Williams, Michael Sherraden, Debra Haire-Joshu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Poverty is associated with negative health outcomes, including depression. Little is known about the specific elements of poverty that contribute to depression, particularly among African American women at risk for type 2 diabetes. This study examined the relationships of economic and social resources to depression among African American women at high risk for the development of type 2 diabetes (N = 181) using the Conservation of Resources theory as a conceptual framework. Women were assessed at 3 time points in conjunction with a dietary change intervention. At baseline, 40% of women reported clinically significant depression, and 43.3% were below the poverty line. Depressed women reported fewer economic assets and greater economic distress than nondepressed peers. Multivariate logistic regression analyses indicated that nonwork status, lack of home ownership, low appraisal of one's economic situation, low self-esteem, and increased life events were significantly associated with depression at baseline. Longitudinal multivariate logistic regression models indicated that income, home ownership, future economic appraisal, life events, and self-esteem predicted depression trajectories at Time 3. These results speak to the multifaceted sources of stress in the lives of poor African American women. Interventions that address the economic and social factors associated with depression are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)172-181
Number of pages10
JournalAnnals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume25
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Poverty
African Americans
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Depression
Economics
Ownership
Logistic Models
Self Concept
Regression Analysis
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

de Groot, M., Auslander, W., Williams, J. H., Sherraden, M., & Haire-Joshu, D. (2003). Depression and poverty among African American women at risk for type 2 diabetes. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 25(3), 172-181.

Depression and poverty among African American women at risk for type 2 diabetes. / de Groot, Mary; Auslander, Wendy; Williams, James Herbert; Sherraden, Michael; Haire-Joshu, Debra.

In: Annals of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 25, No. 3, 2003, p. 172-181.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

de Groot, M, Auslander, W, Williams, JH, Sherraden, M & Haire-Joshu, D 2003, 'Depression and poverty among African American women at risk for type 2 diabetes', Annals of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 25, no. 3, pp. 172-181.
de Groot M, Auslander W, Williams JH, Sherraden M, Haire-Joshu D. Depression and poverty among African American women at risk for type 2 diabetes. Annals of Behavioral Medicine. 2003;25(3):172-181.
de Groot, Mary ; Auslander, Wendy ; Williams, James Herbert ; Sherraden, Michael ; Haire-Joshu, Debra. / Depression and poverty among African American women at risk for type 2 diabetes. In: Annals of Behavioral Medicine. 2003 ; Vol. 25, No. 3. pp. 172-181.
@article{c4a6ca2b7eb242c29b48a04ce7ee18c8,
title = "Depression and poverty among African American women at risk for type 2 diabetes",
abstract = "Poverty is associated with negative health outcomes, including depression. Little is known about the specific elements of poverty that contribute to depression, particularly among African American women at risk for type 2 diabetes. This study examined the relationships of economic and social resources to depression among African American women at high risk for the development of type 2 diabetes (N = 181) using the Conservation of Resources theory as a conceptual framework. Women were assessed at 3 time points in conjunction with a dietary change intervention. At baseline, 40{\%} of women reported clinically significant depression, and 43.3{\%} were below the poverty line. Depressed women reported fewer economic assets and greater economic distress than nondepressed peers. Multivariate logistic regression analyses indicated that nonwork status, lack of home ownership, low appraisal of one's economic situation, low self-esteem, and increased life events were significantly associated with depression at baseline. Longitudinal multivariate logistic regression models indicated that income, home ownership, future economic appraisal, life events, and self-esteem predicted depression trajectories at Time 3. These results speak to the multifaceted sources of stress in the lives of poor African American women. Interventions that address the economic and social factors associated with depression are needed.",
author = "{de Groot}, Mary and Wendy Auslander and Williams, {James Herbert} and Michael Sherraden and Debra Haire-Joshu",
year = "2003",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "25",
pages = "172--181",
journal = "Annals of Behavioral Medicine",
issn = "0883-6612",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Depression and poverty among African American women at risk for type 2 diabetes

AU - de Groot, Mary

AU - Auslander, Wendy

AU - Williams, James Herbert

AU - Sherraden, Michael

AU - Haire-Joshu, Debra

PY - 2003

Y1 - 2003

N2 - Poverty is associated with negative health outcomes, including depression. Little is known about the specific elements of poverty that contribute to depression, particularly among African American women at risk for type 2 diabetes. This study examined the relationships of economic and social resources to depression among African American women at high risk for the development of type 2 diabetes (N = 181) using the Conservation of Resources theory as a conceptual framework. Women were assessed at 3 time points in conjunction with a dietary change intervention. At baseline, 40% of women reported clinically significant depression, and 43.3% were below the poverty line. Depressed women reported fewer economic assets and greater economic distress than nondepressed peers. Multivariate logistic regression analyses indicated that nonwork status, lack of home ownership, low appraisal of one's economic situation, low self-esteem, and increased life events were significantly associated with depression at baseline. Longitudinal multivariate logistic regression models indicated that income, home ownership, future economic appraisal, life events, and self-esteem predicted depression trajectories at Time 3. These results speak to the multifaceted sources of stress in the lives of poor African American women. Interventions that address the economic and social factors associated with depression are needed.

AB - Poverty is associated with negative health outcomes, including depression. Little is known about the specific elements of poverty that contribute to depression, particularly among African American women at risk for type 2 diabetes. This study examined the relationships of economic and social resources to depression among African American women at high risk for the development of type 2 diabetes (N = 181) using the Conservation of Resources theory as a conceptual framework. Women were assessed at 3 time points in conjunction with a dietary change intervention. At baseline, 40% of women reported clinically significant depression, and 43.3% were below the poverty line. Depressed women reported fewer economic assets and greater economic distress than nondepressed peers. Multivariate logistic regression analyses indicated that nonwork status, lack of home ownership, low appraisal of one's economic situation, low self-esteem, and increased life events were significantly associated with depression at baseline. Longitudinal multivariate logistic regression models indicated that income, home ownership, future economic appraisal, life events, and self-esteem predicted depression trajectories at Time 3. These results speak to the multifaceted sources of stress in the lives of poor African American women. Interventions that address the economic and social factors associated with depression are needed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0038120854&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0038120854&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 25

SP - 172

EP - 181

JO - Annals of Behavioral Medicine

JF - Annals of Behavioral Medicine

SN - 0883-6612

IS - 3

ER -