Depressive symptoms and metabolic markers of risk for type 2 diabetes in obese adolescents

Tamara Hannon, Dana L. Rofey, Sojung Lee, Silva A. Arslanian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Although higher rates of depression are found among individuals with type 2 diabetes, it remains unknown if the presence of depressive symptoms is associated with heightened metabolic risk for the development of type 2 diabetes among youth. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether depressive symptoms in obese adolescents are associated with impaired β-cell function relative to insulin sensitivity [oral disposition index (oDI)] and/or dysglycemia or prediabetes, predictors of type 2 diabetes development. Research design and methods: Fasting and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)-derived indices of glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, secretion, and oDI were evaluated in obese youth (n=56, age 15.0±1.6yr, 68% female). The Children's Depression Inventory was utilized to determine depressive symptomatology. Results: Despite no association between depressive symptoms and measures of adiposity, youth with higher depressive symptoms had (i) significantly higher fasting and stimulated glucose levels (13% higher glucose area under the OGTT curve), (ii) ~50% lower oDI, and (iii) a 50% frequency of prediabetes. Conclusions: These data point to an important relationship between depressive symptoms and a heightened metabolic risk for type 2 diabetes in obese adolescents, including prediabetes and impairment in β-cell function relative to insulin sensitivity. While the directionality of these relationships is unknown, it should be determined if treating one disorder improves the other or vice versa.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)497-503
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Diabetes
Volume14
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Depression
Prediabetic State
Insulin Resistance
Glucose Tolerance Test
Glucose
Fasting
Adiposity
Research Design
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Depression
  • IGT
  • Insulin secretion
  • Insulin sensitivity
  • Obesity
  • Prediabetes
  • Type 2 diabetes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Depressive symptoms and metabolic markers of risk for type 2 diabetes in obese adolescents. / Hannon, Tamara; Rofey, Dana L.; Lee, Sojung; Arslanian, Silva A.

In: Pediatric Diabetes, Vol. 14, No. 7, 2013, p. 497-503.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hannon, Tamara ; Rofey, Dana L. ; Lee, Sojung ; Arslanian, Silva A. / Depressive symptoms and metabolic markers of risk for type 2 diabetes in obese adolescents. In: Pediatric Diabetes. 2013 ; Vol. 14, No. 7. pp. 497-503.
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