Detection of active human herpesvirus-6 infection in the brain: Correlation with polymerase chain reaction detection in cerebrospinal fluid

Julie Fotheringham, Nahid Akhyani, Alexander Vortmeyer, Donatella Donati, Elizabeth Williams, Unsong Oh, Michael Bishop, John Barrett, Juan Gea-Banacloche, Steven Jacobson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

76 Scopus citations

Abstract

One-half of bone-marrow transplant (BMT) and stem-cell transplant recipients have reactivation of latent human herpesvirus (HHV)-6 2-4 weeks after transplant. Although the detection of viral DNA, RNA, and antigen in brain material confirmed active HHV-6 variant B infection, peak viral loads in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum occurred 2-4 weeks before death and decreased to low levels before or at autopsy. All autopsy samples consistently demonstrated HHV-6 active infection in the hippocampus. Astrocytic cells positive for viral antigen provided support for an HHV-6-specific tropism for hippocampal astrocytes. HHV-6 DNA in CSF and serum may not reflect the level of active viral infection in the brain after BMT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)450-454
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume195
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

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    Fotheringham, J., Akhyani, N., Vortmeyer, A., Donati, D., Williams, E., Oh, U., Bishop, M., Barrett, J., Gea-Banacloche, J., & Jacobson, S. (2007). Detection of active human herpesvirus-6 infection in the brain: Correlation with polymerase chain reaction detection in cerebrospinal fluid. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 195(3), 450-454. https://doi.org/10.1086/510757