Detection of active human herpesvirus-6 infection in the brain

Correlation with polymerase chain reaction detection in cerebrospinal fluid

Julie Fotheringham, Nahid Akhyani, Alexander Vortmeyer, Donatella Donati, Elizabeth Williams, Unsong Oh, Michael Bishop, John Barrett, Juan Gea-Banacloche, Steven Jacobson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One-half of bone-marrow transplant (BMT) and stem-cell transplant recipients have reactivation of latent human herpesvirus (HHV)-6 2-4 weeks after transplant. Although the detection of viral DNA, RNA, and antigen in brain material confirmed active HHV-6 variant B infection, peak viral loads in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum occurred 2-4 weeks before death and decreased to low levels before or at autopsy. All autopsy samples consistently demonstrated HHV-6 active infection in the hippocampus. Astrocytic cells positive for viral antigen provided support for an HHV-6-specific tropism for hippocampal astrocytes. HHV-6 DNA in CSF and serum may not reflect the level of active viral infection in the brain after BMT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)450-454
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume195
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Human Herpesvirus 6
Herpesviridae Infections
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Brain
Transplants
Viral Antigens
Autopsy
Bone Marrow
Tropism
Human Herpesvirus 2
Viral DNA
Viral RNA
Virus Diseases
Infection
Viral Load
Serum
Astrocytes
Hippocampus
Stem Cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Detection of active human herpesvirus-6 infection in the brain : Correlation with polymerase chain reaction detection in cerebrospinal fluid. / Fotheringham, Julie; Akhyani, Nahid; Vortmeyer, Alexander; Donati, Donatella; Williams, Elizabeth; Oh, Unsong; Bishop, Michael; Barrett, John; Gea-Banacloche, Juan; Jacobson, Steven.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 195, No. 3, 01.02.2007, p. 450-454.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fotheringham, J, Akhyani, N, Vortmeyer, A, Donati, D, Williams, E, Oh, U, Bishop, M, Barrett, J, Gea-Banacloche, J & Jacobson, S 2007, 'Detection of active human herpesvirus-6 infection in the brain: Correlation with polymerase chain reaction detection in cerebrospinal fluid', Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 195, no. 3, pp. 450-454. https://doi.org/10.1086/510757
Fotheringham, Julie ; Akhyani, Nahid ; Vortmeyer, Alexander ; Donati, Donatella ; Williams, Elizabeth ; Oh, Unsong ; Bishop, Michael ; Barrett, John ; Gea-Banacloche, Juan ; Jacobson, Steven. / Detection of active human herpesvirus-6 infection in the brain : Correlation with polymerase chain reaction detection in cerebrospinal fluid. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2007 ; Vol. 195, No. 3. pp. 450-454.
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