Detection of active human herpesvirus-6 infection in the brain: Correlation with polymerase chain reaction detection in cerebrospinal fluid

Julie Fotheringham, Nahid Akhyani, Alexander Vortmeyer, Donatella Donati, Elizabeth Williams, Unsong Oh, Michael Bishop, John Barrett, Juan Gea-Banacloche, Steven Jacobson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One-half of bone-marrow transplant (BMT) and stem-cell transplant recipients have reactivation of latent human herpesvirus (HHV)-6 2-4 weeks after transplant. Although the detection of viral DNA, RNA, and antigen in brain material confirmed active HHV-6 variant B infection, peak viral loads in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum occurred 2-4 weeks before death and decreased to low levels before or at autopsy. All autopsy samples consistently demonstrated HHV-6 active infection in the hippocampus. Astrocytic cells positive for viral antigen provided support for an HHV-6-specific tropism for hippocampal astrocytes. HHV-6 DNA in CSF and serum may not reflect the level of active viral infection in the brain after BMT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)450-454
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume195
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Human Herpesvirus 6
Herpesviridae Infections
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Brain
Transplants
Viral Antigens
Autopsy
Bone Marrow
Tropism
Human Herpesvirus 2
Viral DNA
Viral RNA
Virus Diseases
Infection
Viral Load
Serum
Astrocytes
Hippocampus
Stem Cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Detection of active human herpesvirus-6 infection in the brain : Correlation with polymerase chain reaction detection in cerebrospinal fluid. / Fotheringham, Julie; Akhyani, Nahid; Vortmeyer, Alexander; Donati, Donatella; Williams, Elizabeth; Oh, Unsong; Bishop, Michael; Barrett, John; Gea-Banacloche, Juan; Jacobson, Steven.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 195, No. 3, 01.02.2007, p. 450-454.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fotheringham, J, Akhyani, N, Vortmeyer, A, Donati, D, Williams, E, Oh, U, Bishop, M, Barrett, J, Gea-Banacloche, J & Jacobson, S 2007, 'Detection of active human herpesvirus-6 infection in the brain: Correlation with polymerase chain reaction detection in cerebrospinal fluid', Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 195, no. 3, pp. 450-454. https://doi.org/10.1086/510757
Fotheringham, Julie ; Akhyani, Nahid ; Vortmeyer, Alexander ; Donati, Donatella ; Williams, Elizabeth ; Oh, Unsong ; Bishop, Michael ; Barrett, John ; Gea-Banacloche, Juan ; Jacobson, Steven. / Detection of active human herpesvirus-6 infection in the brain : Correlation with polymerase chain reaction detection in cerebrospinal fluid. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2007 ; Vol. 195, No. 3. pp. 450-454.
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