Detection of clonal IGH gene rearrangements

Summary of Molecular Oncology Surveys of the College of American Pathologists

Marina N. Nikiforova, Eric D. Hsi, Rita M. Braziel, Margaret L. Gulley, Debra G B Leonard, Jan A. Nowak, Raymond R. Tubbs, Gail Vance, Vivianna M. Van Deerlin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context. - The diagnosis of B-cell lymphoid malignancy can frequently be substantiated by detecting clonal immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) gene rearrangements, which is typically done by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and/or Southern blot analysis. Objective. - To characterize current laboratory practice for the assessment of IGH rearrangements and to identify opportunities for improvement. Design. - The data from the Molecular Oncology Proficiency Survey distributed to participating laboratories by the Molecular Pathology Committee of the College of American Pathologisis from 1998 through 2003 were analyzed. Results. - Thirty-nine proficiency survey specimens (29 positive and 10 negative for clonal IGH rearrangements) were distributed. For Southern blot analysis, 944 results were reported, with a successful response rate of 95%. For PCR detection, 2349 results were reported, with a successful response rate of 72%. A higher rate of successful responses by PCR was achieved using framework 3 primers in combination with other frameworks (82%) compared with framework 3 primers only (76%) and when fresh/ frozen (72%) compared with paraffin-embedded (65%) tissues were analyzed. Conclusions. - The performance of the participating laboratories was very good, by both Southern blot and PCR analysis. As expected, Southern blot analysis consistently detects a higher proportion of IGH rearrangements than PCR analysis. Further improvement and standardization of the IGH PCR assay is important if it is to replace Southern blot analysis as the standard method. Participation in this survey is a valuable tool for assessing laboratory performance and it directs our attention to areas where we may improve laboratory practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)185-189
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Volume131
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 2007

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Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Genes
Gene Rearrangement
Southern Blotting
Immunoglobulin Heavy Chains
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Molecular Pathology
Paraffin
Pathologists
Surveys and Questionnaires
B-Lymphocytes
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Medical Laboratory Technology

Cite this

Nikiforova, M. N., Hsi, E. D., Braziel, R. M., Gulley, M. L., Leonard, D. G. B., Nowak, J. A., ... Van Deerlin, V. M. (2007). Detection of clonal IGH gene rearrangements: Summary of Molecular Oncology Surveys of the College of American Pathologists. Archives of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, 131(2), 185-189.

Detection of clonal IGH gene rearrangements : Summary of Molecular Oncology Surveys of the College of American Pathologists. / Nikiforova, Marina N.; Hsi, Eric D.; Braziel, Rita M.; Gulley, Margaret L.; Leonard, Debra G B; Nowak, Jan A.; Tubbs, Raymond R.; Vance, Gail; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.

In: Archives of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Vol. 131, No. 2, 02.2007, p. 185-189.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nikiforova, MN, Hsi, ED, Braziel, RM, Gulley, ML, Leonard, DGB, Nowak, JA, Tubbs, RR, Vance, G & Van Deerlin, VM 2007, 'Detection of clonal IGH gene rearrangements: Summary of Molecular Oncology Surveys of the College of American Pathologists', Archives of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, vol. 131, no. 2, pp. 185-189.
Nikiforova, Marina N. ; Hsi, Eric D. ; Braziel, Rita M. ; Gulley, Margaret L. ; Leonard, Debra G B ; Nowak, Jan A. ; Tubbs, Raymond R. ; Vance, Gail ; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M. / Detection of clonal IGH gene rearrangements : Summary of Molecular Oncology Surveys of the College of American Pathologists. In: Archives of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine. 2007 ; Vol. 131, No. 2. pp. 185-189.
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