Detection of vancomycin-resistant enterococci colonization in a children's hospital

John Christenson, E. Kent Korgenski, Eileen Jenkins, Judy A. Daly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are important nosocomial pathogens in many hospitals. The true prevalence of VRE in pediatric hospitals is not known. Methods: A surveillance study was performed at a pediatric tertiary care medical center by using vancomycin-containing screening media. Results: Six children (of 112 screened) were found to be colonized with VRE. Colonized patients had a history of receiving broad- spectrum antimicrobial agents. Conclusion: In the absence of VRE infections, surveillance studies can help determine the extent of VRE colonization and support infection control measures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)569-571
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Infection Control
Volume26
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Pediatric Hospitals
Vancomycin
Infection Control
Anti-Infective Agents
Tertiary Care Centers
Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci
Pediatrics
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Detection of vancomycin-resistant enterococci colonization in a children's hospital. / Christenson, John; Korgenski, E. Kent; Jenkins, Eileen; Daly, Judy A.

In: American Journal of Infection Control, Vol. 26, No. 6, 1998, p. 569-571.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Christenson, John ; Korgenski, E. Kent ; Jenkins, Eileen ; Daly, Judy A. / Detection of vancomycin-resistant enterococci colonization in a children's hospital. In: American Journal of Infection Control. 1998 ; Vol. 26, No. 6. pp. 569-571.
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