Development and Testing of a Scale to Assess Physician Attitudes about Handheld Computers with Decision Support

Midge N. Ray, Thomas K. Houston, Feliciano B. Yu, Nir Menachemi, Richard S. Maisiak, Jeroan J. Allison, Eta S. Berner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The authors developed and evaluated a rating scale, the Attitudes toward Handheld Decision Support Software Scale (H-DSS), to assess physician attitudes about handheld decision support systems. Design: The authors conducted a prospective assessment of psychometric characteristics of the H-DSS including reliability, validity, and responsiveness. Participants were 82 Internal Medicine residents. A higher score on each of the 14 five-point Likert scale items reflected a more positive attitude about handheld DSS. The H-DSS score is the mean across the fourteen items. Attitudes toward the use of the handheld DSS were assessed prior to and six months after receiving the handheld device. Statistics: Cronbach's Alpha was used to assess internal consistency reliability. Pearson correlations were used to estimate and detect significant associations between scale scores and other measures (validity). Paired sample t-tests were used to test for changes in the mean attitude scale score (responsiveness) and for differences between groups. Results: Internal consistency reliability for the scale was α = 0.73. In testing validity, moderate correlations were noted between the attitude scale scores and self-reported Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) usage in the hospital (correlation coefficient = 0.55) and clinic (0.48), p < 0.05 for both. The scale was responsive, in that it detected the expected increase in scores between the two administrations (3.99 (s.d. = 0.35) vs. 4.08, (s.d. = 0.34), p < 0.005). Conclusion: The authors' evaluation showed that the H-DSS scale was reliable, valid, and responsive. The scale can be used to guide future handheld DSS development and implementation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)567-572
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Medical Informatics Association
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Handheld Computers
Physicians
Software
Internal Medicine
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Development and Testing of a Scale to Assess Physician Attitudes about Handheld Computers with Decision Support. / Ray, Midge N.; Houston, Thomas K.; Yu, Feliciano B.; Menachemi, Nir; Maisiak, Richard S.; Allison, Jeroan J.; Berner, Eta S.

In: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, Vol. 13, No. 5, 01.09.2006, p. 567-572.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ray, Midge N. ; Houston, Thomas K. ; Yu, Feliciano B. ; Menachemi, Nir ; Maisiak, Richard S. ; Allison, Jeroan J. ; Berner, Eta S. / Development and Testing of a Scale to Assess Physician Attitudes about Handheld Computers with Decision Support. In: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association. 2006 ; Vol. 13, No. 5. pp. 567-572.
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