Development and Use of an Instrument Adapted to Assess the Clinical Skills Learning Environment in the Pre-clinical Years

Rebecca E. Rdesinski, Kathryn G. Chappelle, Diane L. Elliot, Debra Litzelman, Ryan T. Palmer, Frances E. Biagioli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The Communication, Curriculum, and Culture (C3) instrument is a well-established survey for measuring the professional learning climate or hidden curriculum in the clinical years of medical school. However, few instruments exist for assessing professionalism in the pre-clinical years. We adapted the C3 instrument and assessed its utility during the pre-clinical years at two U.S. medical schools. Methods: The ten-item Pre-clinical C3 survey was adapted from the C3 instrument. Surveys were administered at the conclusion of the first and second years of medical school using a repeated cross-sectional design. Factor analysis was performed and Cronbach’s alphas were calculated for emerging dimensions. Results: The authors collected 458 and 564 surveys at two medical schools during AY06-07 and AY07-09 years, respectively. Factor analysis of the survey data revealed nine items in three dimensions: “Patients as Objects”, “Talking Respectfully of Colleagues”, and “Patient-Centered Behaviors”. Reliability measures (Cronbach’s alpha) for the Pre-clinical C3 survey data were similar to those of the C3 survey for comparable dimensions for each school. Gender analysis revealed significant differences in all three dimensions. Conclusions: The Pre-clinical C3 instrument’s performance was similar to the C3 instrument in measuring dimensions of professionalism. As medical education moves toward earlier and more frequent clinical and inter-professional educational experiences, the Pre-clinical C3 instrument may be especially useful in evaluating the impact of curricular revisions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)285-291
Number of pages7
JournalMedical Science Educator
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

Fingerprint

Clinical Competence
learning environment
Learning
Medical Schools
school
Curriculum
Statistical Factor Analysis
factor analysis
curriculum
Medical Education
Surveys and Questionnaires
Climate
Communication
climate
communication
gender
learning
performance

Keywords

  • Evaluation
  • Patient-centered care
  • Pre-clinical curriculum
  • Professionalism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Education

Cite this

Development and Use of an Instrument Adapted to Assess the Clinical Skills Learning Environment in the Pre-clinical Years. / Rdesinski, Rebecca E.; Chappelle, Kathryn G.; Elliot, Diane L.; Litzelman, Debra; Palmer, Ryan T.; Biagioli, Frances E.

In: Medical Science Educator, Vol. 25, No. 3, 01.09.2015, p. 285-291.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rdesinski, Rebecca E. ; Chappelle, Kathryn G. ; Elliot, Diane L. ; Litzelman, Debra ; Palmer, Ryan T. ; Biagioli, Frances E. / Development and Use of an Instrument Adapted to Assess the Clinical Skills Learning Environment in the Pre-clinical Years. In: Medical Science Educator. 2015 ; Vol. 25, No. 3. pp. 285-291.
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