Development of adolescent self-report measures from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health

Renee E. Sieving, Trisha Beuhring, Michael D. Resnick, Linda H. Bearinger, Marcia Shew, Marjorie Ireland, Robert W. Blum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

157 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To present a set of multi-item indicators and associated reliability estimates derived from early research with survey data from adolescents participating in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). Methods: Add Health provides information on the health and health-related behaviors of a nationally representative sample of U.S. adolescents, as well as on individual-level and contextual factors that either promote young peoples' health or increase their health risk. Specifically, the 135-page in-home adolescent survey instrument includes multiple items intended to measure individual-level and social-environmental constructs relevant to adolescent health and well-being. This article details the development of a set of multi-item scales and indices from Add Health in-home adolescent survey data. These steps include identification of inconsistent responders, use of a split-halves approach to measurement validation, and use of a deductive approach in the development of scales and item composites. Results: Estimates of internal consistency reliability suggest that many of the multi-item measures have acceptable levels of internal consistency across grade, gender, and race/ethnic groups included in this nationally representative sample of adolescents. In addition, moderate to high bivariate correlations between selected measures provide initial evidence of underlying latent constructs. Conclusions: This article provides adolescent health researchers with a set of methodologic procedures and measures developed in early research on the Add Health core adolescent data set.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)73-81
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

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National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health
Adolescent Development
Self Report
Health
Child Welfare
Ethnic Groups
Research
Research Personnel

Keywords

  • Add Health
  • Adolescence
  • Health surveys
  • Self-report measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Development of adolescent self-report measures from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. / Sieving, Renee E.; Beuhring, Trisha; Resnick, Michael D.; Bearinger, Linda H.; Shew, Marcia; Ireland, Marjorie; Blum, Robert W.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 28, No. 1, 2001, p. 73-81.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sieving, Renee E. ; Beuhring, Trisha ; Resnick, Michael D. ; Bearinger, Linda H. ; Shew, Marcia ; Ireland, Marjorie ; Blum, Robert W. / Development of adolescent self-report measures from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. In: Journal of Adolescent Health. 2001 ; Vol. 28, No. 1. pp. 73-81.
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