Development of anatomically realistic PET and PET/CT phantoms with rapid prototyping technology

Michael A. Miller, Gary Hutchins

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The utility of PET and PET/CT in research and diagnosis of cancer, cardiac and neurological disorders has been widely demonstrated. Phantoms with well defined geometries that accurately model radiolabeled tracer concentrations and photon attenuation coefficients are suited for characterization of imaging systems, but not as well suited for evaluating methods sensitive to detailed anatomical structure, such as algorithms for monitoring tumor response. An ideal phantom would have the shape and activity distribution of a realistic tumor and would be useful in evaluation of automated image analysis systems. Such a phantom, imaged at sites involved in clinical trials, would be valuable for evaluating consistency and accuracy. We have developed a method of creating such phantoms by incorporating radioactive tracer as dye for a cellulose powder based rapid prototyping system. This allows us to create phantoms with spatial resolution limited only by the stereolithography printer system (slice thickness is 0.18 mm, printing resolution is 600 dpi). We have evaluated the method by printing several small phantoms with 18F and measuring activity in a gamma counter. The relative standard deviation of the activity of multiple identical phantoms was 2%. Activity in unlabeled parts was less than 2% of adjacent labeled regions. We have created and printed realistic phantoms based on the SPL human brain atlas [1,2], the Paxinos & Watson rat brain atlas [3] and from PET/CT images of human lung nodules, showing that this is a practical method for making complex radioactive phantoms that model real anatomy. We are proceeding with further development to allow us to produce phantoms with multiple activity concentrations, tunable photon attenuation coefficients and long lived isotopes.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record
Pages4252-4257
Number of pages6
Volume6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007
Event2007 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference, NSS-MIC - Honolulu, HI, United States
Duration: Oct 27 2007Nov 3 2007

Other

Other2007 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference, NSS-MIC
CountryUnited States
CityHonolulu, HI
Period10/27/0711/3/07

Fingerprint

Rapid prototyping
Printing
Tumors
Brain
Photons
Printers (computer)
Stereolithography
Radioactive tracers
Imaging systems
Image analysis
Isotopes
Rats
Cellulose
Dyes
Powders
Geometry
Monitoring

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

Miller, M. A., & Hutchins, G. (2007). Development of anatomically realistic PET and PET/CT phantoms with rapid prototyping technology. In IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record (Vol. 6, pp. 4252-4257). [4437056] https://doi.org/10.1109/NSSMIC.2007.4437056

Development of anatomically realistic PET and PET/CT phantoms with rapid prototyping technology. / Miller, Michael A.; Hutchins, Gary.

IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record. Vol. 6 2007. p. 4252-4257 4437056.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Miller, MA & Hutchins, G 2007, Development of anatomically realistic PET and PET/CT phantoms with rapid prototyping technology. in IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record. vol. 6, 4437056, pp. 4252-4257, 2007 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference, NSS-MIC, Honolulu, HI, United States, 10/27/07. https://doi.org/10.1109/NSSMIC.2007.4437056
Miller MA, Hutchins G. Development of anatomically realistic PET and PET/CT phantoms with rapid prototyping technology. In IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record. Vol. 6. 2007. p. 4252-4257. 4437056 https://doi.org/10.1109/NSSMIC.2007.4437056
Miller, Michael A. ; Hutchins, Gary. / Development of anatomically realistic PET and PET/CT phantoms with rapid prototyping technology. IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record. Vol. 6 2007. pp. 4252-4257
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