Development of high throughput dispersive LC-ion mobility-TOFMS techniques for analysing the human plasma proteome

Xiaoyun Liu, Manolo Plasencia, Susanne Ragg, Stephen J. Valentine, David E. Clemmer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A technique that combines ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with reversed-phase liquid chromatography (LC), collision-induced dissociation (CID) and mass spectrometry (MS) has been developed. The approach is described as a high throughput means of analysing complex mixtures of peptides that arise from enzymatic digestion of protein mixtures. In this approach, peptides are separated by LC and, as they elute from the column, they are introduced into the gas phase and ionised by electrospray ionisation. The beam of ions is accumulated in an ion trap and then the concentrated ion packet is injected into a drift tube where the ions are separated again in the gas phase by IMS, a technique that differentiates ions based on their mobilities through a buffer gas. As ions exit the drift tube, they can be subjected to collisional activation to produce fragments prior to being introduced into a mass spectrometer for detection. The IMS separation can be carried out in only a few milliseconds and offers a number of advantages compared with LC-MS alone. An example of a single 21-minute LC-IMS-(CID)-MS analysis of the human plasma proteome reveals ∼20,000 parent ions and ∼600,000 fragment ions and evidence for 227 unique protein assignments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)177-186
Number of pages10
JournalBriefings in Functional Genomics and Proteomics
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2004

Fingerprint

Plasma (human)
Liquid chromatography
Proteome
Liquid Chromatography
Throughput
Ions
Spectrometry
Spectrum Analysis
Mass spectrometry
Mass Spectrometry
Gases
Electrospray ionization
Peptides
Mass spectrometers
Reverse-Phase Chromatography
Complex Mixtures
Proteolysis
Buffers
Proteins

Keywords

  • Biomarker
  • Ion mobility spectrometry
  • Mass spectrometry
  • Plasma
  • Proteomics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Development of high throughput dispersive LC-ion mobility-TOFMS techniques for analysing the human plasma proteome. / Liu, Xiaoyun; Plasencia, Manolo; Ragg, Susanne; Valentine, Stephen J.; Clemmer, David E.

In: Briefings in Functional Genomics and Proteomics, Vol. 3, No. 2, 08.2004, p. 177-186.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Liu, Xiaoyun ; Plasencia, Manolo ; Ragg, Susanne ; Valentine, Stephen J. ; Clemmer, David E. / Development of high throughput dispersive LC-ion mobility-TOFMS techniques for analysing the human plasma proteome. In: Briefings in Functional Genomics and Proteomics. 2004 ; Vol. 3, No. 2. pp. 177-186.
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