Diagnosis of chlamydial infection in women attending antenatal and gynecologic clinics

J. W. Smith, R. E. Rogers, B. P. Katz, J. F. Brickler, P. L. Lineback, B. Van der Pol, R. B. Jones

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Abstract

Two antigen detection systems (MicroTrak [MT], Syva Co., Palo Alto, Calif.; and Chlamydiazyme [CZ], Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, Ill.) were compared with semiquantitative culture for diagnosis of chlamydial infection in 1,059 patients. Cultures were done on microtiter plates and blind passaged once. Culture-negative but CZ- or MT-positive specimens were recultured. True positives were positive by either initial or repeat cultures. Of 827 nonpregnant and 231 pregnant patients, 9.1 and 12.1%, respectively, had positive cultures. Overall sensitivity of the initial culture was 48.5% without passage and 86.4% with passage. The sensitivity of CZ was 67%. The sensitivity of MT in our laboratory was 50%; however, further review of these specimens by Syva employees gave a sensitivity of 71.6%. MT and CZ were more sensitive for pregnant patients (MT, 84.6%; CZ, 85.7%) than for nonpregnant patients (MT, 65.5%; CZ, 60.0%). All the tests had specificities above 95%. Of the specimens that were positive after initial culture without subculture, MT-negative specimens had a mean of 3.7 inclusions in culture, and MT-positive specimens had a mean of 24.8 (P = 0.002); CZ-negative specimens had a mean of 4.3 inclusions, and CZ-positive specimens had a mean of 20.0 (P = 0.026). In addition, cultures of specimens from pregnant patients had more inclusions than did those from gynecology patients, but this was not statistically significant (P = 0.096). No method is ideal; however, MT and CZ were less sensitive than was this culture system for detecting chlamydial infection in patients in gynecology clinics and were of comparable sensitivity for pregnant patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)868-872
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of clinical microbiology
Volume25
Issue number5
StatePublished - Jun 10 1987

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Infection
Gynecology
Antigens

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Smith, J. W., Rogers, R. E., Katz, B. P., Brickler, J. F., Lineback, P. L., Van der Pol, B., & Jones, R. B. (1987). Diagnosis of chlamydial infection in women attending antenatal and gynecologic clinics. Journal of clinical microbiology, 25(5), 868-872.

Diagnosis of chlamydial infection in women attending antenatal and gynecologic clinics. / Smith, J. W.; Rogers, R. E.; Katz, B. P.; Brickler, J. F.; Lineback, P. L.; Van der Pol, B.; Jones, R. B.

In: Journal of clinical microbiology, Vol. 25, No. 5, 10.06.1987, p. 868-872.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smith, JW, Rogers, RE, Katz, BP, Brickler, JF, Lineback, PL, Van der Pol, B & Jones, RB 1987, 'Diagnosis of chlamydial infection in women attending antenatal and gynecologic clinics', Journal of clinical microbiology, vol. 25, no. 5, pp. 868-872.
Smith JW, Rogers RE, Katz BP, Brickler JF, Lineback PL, Van der Pol B et al. Diagnosis of chlamydial infection in women attending antenatal and gynecologic clinics. Journal of clinical microbiology. 1987 Jun 10;25(5):868-872.
Smith, J. W. ; Rogers, R. E. ; Katz, B. P. ; Brickler, J. F. ; Lineback, P. L. ; Van der Pol, B. ; Jones, R. B. / Diagnosis of chlamydial infection in women attending antenatal and gynecologic clinics. In: Journal of clinical microbiology. 1987 ; Vol. 25, No. 5. pp. 868-872.
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abstract = "Two antigen detection systems (MicroTrak [MT], Syva Co., Palo Alto, Calif.; and Chlamydiazyme [CZ], Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, Ill.) were compared with semiquantitative culture for diagnosis of chlamydial infection in 1,059 patients. Cultures were done on microtiter plates and blind passaged once. Culture-negative but CZ- or MT-positive specimens were recultured. True positives were positive by either initial or repeat cultures. Of 827 nonpregnant and 231 pregnant patients, 9.1 and 12.1{\%}, respectively, had positive cultures. Overall sensitivity of the initial culture was 48.5{\%} without passage and 86.4{\%} with passage. The sensitivity of CZ was 67{\%}. The sensitivity of MT in our laboratory was 50{\%}; however, further review of these specimens by Syva employees gave a sensitivity of 71.6{\%}. MT and CZ were more sensitive for pregnant patients (MT, 84.6{\%}; CZ, 85.7{\%}) than for nonpregnant patients (MT, 65.5{\%}; CZ, 60.0{\%}). All the tests had specificities above 95{\%}. Of the specimens that were positive after initial culture without subculture, MT-negative specimens had a mean of 3.7 inclusions in culture, and MT-positive specimens had a mean of 24.8 (P = 0.002); CZ-negative specimens had a mean of 4.3 inclusions, and CZ-positive specimens had a mean of 20.0 (P = 0.026). In addition, cultures of specimens from pregnant patients had more inclusions than did those from gynecology patients, but this was not statistically significant (P = 0.096). No method is ideal; however, MT and CZ were less sensitive than was this culture system for detecting chlamydial infection in patients in gynecology clinics and were of comparable sensitivity for pregnant patients.",
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