Dietary carbohydrate assimilation in the premature infant: Evidence for a nutritionally significant bacterial ecosystem in the colon

C. L. Kien, E. A. Liechty, D. Z. Myerberg, M. D. Mullet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Carbohydrate energy absorption and breath hydrogen concentration were measured in 12 premature infants 28-32 wk gestational age and 2-4 wk postnatal age. Each of two groups of six infants were randomly assigned to receive one of two formulas that differed only in carbohydrate source: 100% lactose (LAC) or 50% lactose: 50% glucose polymer (LAC + GP). In 11 infants the peak breath hydrogen concentrations suggested extensive colonic fermentation (range 44-239 ppm/5% CO2 or 44-239 μL/L per 50 mL/L CO2). An approximate 100% increase in lactose intake in the LAC group was associated with a similar increase in breath hydrogen concentration at 30, 60, and 120 min. None of the infants exhibited diarrhea or vomiting or developed delayed gastric emptying. Carbohydrate energy absorption (χ̄ ± SD) was, respectively, 86 ± 5% and 91 ± 3% in the LAC and the LAC+ GP groups (p > 0.05). Thus, colonic bacterial fermentation may be critical to energy balance and to the prevention of osmotic diarrhea in premature infants fed lactose.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)456-460
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume46
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1987
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dietary Carbohydrates
dietary carbohydrate
Lactose
Premature Infants
lactose
colon
Ecosystem
assimilation (physiology)
Colon
ecosystems
hydrogen
Hydrogen
Carbohydrates
carbohydrates
Fermentation
Diarrhea
diarrhea
fermentation
gastric emptying
Glucans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Dietary carbohydrate assimilation in the premature infant : Evidence for a nutritionally significant bacterial ecosystem in the colon. / Kien, C. L.; Liechty, E. A.; Myerberg, D. Z.; Mullet, M. D.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 46, No. 3, 1987, p. 456-460.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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