Dietary changes and the incidence of urinary calculi in the U.K. between 1958 and 1976

W. G. Robertson, Munro Peacock, A. Hodgkinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

82 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A retrospective study has shown that the annual number of hospital in-patient discharges for urinary calculi in the U.K. increased by 45% between 1958 and 1969. The annual rate of discharges in the U.K. as a whole and in the various regions of the country was related to the real expenditure on food with a delay of 2 yr between the consumption of food and discharge from hospital for stones. The period of inflation between 1970 and 1976 caused a reduction in the expenditure on food. This coincided, 2 yr later, with a levelling off and, in some regions, a reduction in the number of discharges for calculi. Analysis of dietary composition over the period 1956-1976 revealed no relationship between the number of discharges for stones and the household consumption of calcium, oxalate, magnesium, phosphorus, refined carbohydrate or total protein. There was, however, a marked correspondence between the number of discharges for stones and the consumption of animal protein, particularly that derived from meat, fish and poultry. A fall in the consumption of dietary fibre and an increase in dietary acid may also have contributed to the observed changes in the pattern of stone-formation during the period of study. Mechanisms are suggested by which an increased intake of animal protein may increase the risk of stone-formation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)469-476
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Chronic Diseases
Volume32
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1979
Externally publishedYes

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Urinary Calculi
Health Expenditures
Food
Incidence
Calcium Oxalate
Proteins
Patient Discharge
Economic Inflation
Calculi
Dietary Fiber
Poultry
Meat
Phosphorus
Magnesium
Fishes
Retrospective Studies
Economics
Carbohydrates
Acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Dietary changes and the incidence of urinary calculi in the U.K. between 1958 and 1976. / Robertson, W. G.; Peacock, Munro; Hodgkinson, A.

In: Journal of Chronic Diseases, Vol. 32, No. 6, 1979, p. 469-476.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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