Dietary fish or seafood consumption is not related to cerebrovascular disease risk in twin veterans

Dawn Bravata, Carolyn K. Wells, Lawrence M. Brass, Thomas Morgan, Judith H. Lichtman, John Concato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background/Aims: The results of studies about dietary fish consumption and stroke risk have been conflicting. We sought to examine the relationship between dietary fish and seafood consumption and the risk of stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Methods: We used data from the National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council Twin Registry, a prospective cohort of white male twins born in the US (1917-1927). Participants were asked about fish and seafood consumption in 1972 and 1985. Self-report or death-certificate report of stroke or TIA was obtained in 1996-1998. Results: Among 5,355 participants, 579 (10.8%) had a stroke or TIA. In unmatched analyses, dietary fish and seafood consumption was not associated with stroke or TIA: 10.4% (91/872) of frequent fish or seafood consumers had a stroke or TIA versus 10.9% (488/4,483) of infrequent consumers, p = 0.70. In an analysis of matched twin pairs, frequent fish or seafood consumption was also not associated with stroke or TIA: hazard ratio 0.89, 95% CI 0.59-1.36. Conclusions: These data, from a prospective cohort of white male twins, do not support an association between dietary fish and seafood consumption and stroke or TIA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)186-190
Number of pages5
JournalNeuroepidemiology
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Diseases in Twins
Cerebrovascular Disorders
Seafood
Veterans
Transient Ischemic Attack
Fishes
Stroke
Matched-Pair Analysis
Death Certificates
Self Report
Registries

Keywords

  • Brain infarction
  • Brain ischemia
  • Dietary fish consumption

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Dietary fish or seafood consumption is not related to cerebrovascular disease risk in twin veterans. / Bravata, Dawn; Wells, Carolyn K.; Brass, Lawrence M.; Morgan, Thomas; Lichtman, Judith H.; Concato, John.

In: Neuroepidemiology, Vol. 28, No. 3, 08.2007, p. 186-190.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bravata, Dawn ; Wells, Carolyn K. ; Brass, Lawrence M. ; Morgan, Thomas ; Lichtman, Judith H. ; Concato, John. / Dietary fish or seafood consumption is not related to cerebrovascular disease risk in twin veterans. In: Neuroepidemiology. 2007 ; Vol. 28, No. 3. pp. 186-190.
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