Differential dopamine function in fibromyalgia

Daniel S. Albrecht, Palmer MacKie, David Kareken, Gary Hutchins, Evgeny J. Chumin, Bradley T. Christian, Karmen Yoder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Approximately 30 % of Americans suffer from chronic pain disorders, such as fibromyalgia (FM), which can cause debilitating pain. Many pain-killing drugs prescribed for chronic pain disorders are highly addictive, have limited clinical efficacy, and do not treat the cognitive symptoms reported by many patients. The neurobiological substrates of chronic pain are largely unknown, but evidence points to altered dopaminergic transmission in aberrant pain perception. We sought to characterize the dopamine (DA) system in individuals with FM. Positron emission tomography (PET) with [18F]fallypride (FAL) was used to assess changes in DA during a working memory challenge relative to a baseline task, and to test for associations between baseline D2/D3 availability and experimental pain measures. Twelve female subjects with FM and 11 female controls completed study procedures. Subjects received one FAL PET scan while performing a “2-back” task, and one while performing a “0-back” (attentional control, “baseline”) task. FM subjects had lower baseline FAL binding potential (BP) in several cortical regions relative to controls, including anterior cingulate cortex. In FM subjects, self-reported spontaneous pain negatively correlated with FAL BP in the left orbitofrontal cortex and parahippocampal gyrus. Baseline BP was significantly negatively correlated with experimental pain sensitivity and tolerance in both FM and CON subjects, although spatial patterns of these associations differed between groups. The data suggest that abnormal DA function may be associated with differential processing of pain perception in FM. Further studies are needed to explore the functional significance of DA in nociception and cognitive processing in chronic pain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalBrain Imaging and Behavior
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Oct 24 2015

Fingerprint

Fibromyalgia
Dopamine
Chronic Pain
Pain
Somatoform Disorders
Pain Perception
Prefrontal Cortex
Positron-Emission Tomography
Parahippocampal Gyrus
Neurobehavioral Manifestations
Nociception
Gyrus Cinguli
Short-Term Memory
Pharmaceutical Preparations
fallypride

Keywords

  • Chronic pain
  • Dopamine
  • Fallypride
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Imaging
  • Pain
  • Positron emission tomography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Differential dopamine function in fibromyalgia. / Albrecht, Daniel S.; MacKie, Palmer; Kareken, David; Hutchins, Gary; Chumin, Evgeny J.; Christian, Bradley T.; Yoder, Karmen.

In: Brain Imaging and Behavior, 24.10.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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