Differential Effects of bFGF and IGF-I on Matrix Metabolism in Calf and Adult Bovine Cartilage Explants

R. L. Sah, A. C. Chen, A. J. Grodzinsky, Stephen Trippel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

174 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) on cell and matrix metabolism in calf and adult bovine cartilage explants were examined. In calf cartilage, bFGF elicited dose-dependent and bi-directional effects on mitotic activity and anabolic processes. Addition of bFGF at 3 ng/ml stimulated cell mitotic activity (total DNA) and synthesis of proteoglycan ([35S]sulfate incorporation), protein [3H]proline incorporation), and collagen (formation of [3H]hydroxyproline), and resulted in a slight increase in proteoglycan deposition compared to basal medium. However, 30-300 ng/ml of bFGF inhibited mitotic activity and synthetic processes, accelerated [35S]proteoglycan release compared to basal medium, and resulted in an inhibition of proteoglycan deposition during the culture period. In contrast, treatment of adult cartilage with 3-300 ng/ml of bFGF did not affect the DNA content but did stimulate synthetic processes in a dose-dependent manner. Basic FGF also had bidirectional effects on matrix catabolism in adult cartilage, with 3 ng/ml accelerating [35S]proteoglycan release, but 30-300 ng/ml of bFGF resulting in release rates comparable to that in basal medium. Nonetheless, even with maximal bFGF stimulation, adult bovine cartilage suffered a net loss of proteoglycan during culture. Addition of 3-300 ng/ml of IGF-I to either calf or adult bovine cartilage stimulated synthetic processes and shifted the metabolic balance toward a net deposition of proteoglycan. Neither bFGF nor IGF-I altered the low basal rate of [3H]hydroxyproline release from either calf or adult bovine cartilage. Thus, (i) the regulatory effects of bFGF and IGF-I on bovine articular cartilage appear age-dependent, and (ii) bFGF is capable of promoting either anabolic or catabolic processes, and may therefore serve a dual role in the regulation of cartilage metabolism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)137-147
Number of pages11
JournalArchives of Biochemistry and Biophysics
Volume308
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1994
Externally publishedYes

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Cartilage
Fibroblast Growth Factor 2
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I
Metabolism
Proteoglycans
Hydroxyproline
Fibroblast Growth Factor 3
DNA
Articular Cartilage
Proline
Sulfates
Collagen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Biophysics
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Differential Effects of bFGF and IGF-I on Matrix Metabolism in Calf and Adult Bovine Cartilage Explants. / Sah, R. L.; Chen, A. C.; Grodzinsky, A. J.; Trippel, Stephen.

In: Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Vol. 308, No. 1, 01.1994, p. 137-147.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sah, R. L. ; Chen, A. C. ; Grodzinsky, A. J. ; Trippel, Stephen. / Differential Effects of bFGF and IGF-I on Matrix Metabolism in Calf and Adult Bovine Cartilage Explants. In: Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics. 1994 ; Vol. 308, No. 1. pp. 137-147.
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