Differential working memory load effects after mild traumatic brain injury

Thomas W. McAllister, Molly B. Sparling, Laura A. Flashman, Stephen J. Guerin, Alexander C. Mamourian, Andrew Saykin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

333 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective of this study was to explore the effects of increasing working memory (WM) processing load on previously observed abnormalities in activation of WM circuitry shortly after mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). Brain activation patterns in response to increasing WM processing load (auditory n-back: 0-, 1-, 2-, and 3-back conditions) were assessed with fMRI in 18 MTBI patients within 1 month of their injury and in 12 healthy controls. Performance accuracy on these tasks was also measured. Brain activation patterns differed between MTBI patients and controls in response to increasing WM processing loads. Controls maintained their ability to increase activation in regions of WM circuitry with each increase in WM processing load. MTBI patients showed disproportionately increased activation during the moderate processing load condition, but very little increase in activation associated with the highest processing load condition. Task performance did not differ significantly between groups on any task condition. MTBI patients showed a different pattern of allocation of processing resources associated with a high processing load condition compared to healthy controls, despite similar task performance. This suggests that injury-related changes in ability to activate or modulate WM processing resources might underlie some of the memory complaints after MTBI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1004-1012
Number of pages9
JournalNeuroImage
Volume14
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Brain Concussion
Short-Term Memory
Aptitude
Task Performance and Analysis
Resource Allocation
Wounds and Injuries
Brain
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Neurology

Cite this

McAllister, T. W., Sparling, M. B., Flashman, L. A., Guerin, S. J., Mamourian, A. C., & Saykin, A. (2001). Differential working memory load effects after mild traumatic brain injury. NeuroImage, 14(5), 1004-1012. https://doi.org/10.1006/nimg.2001.0899

Differential working memory load effects after mild traumatic brain injury. / McAllister, Thomas W.; Sparling, Molly B.; Flashman, Laura A.; Guerin, Stephen J.; Mamourian, Alexander C.; Saykin, Andrew.

In: NeuroImage, Vol. 14, No. 5, 2001, p. 1004-1012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McAllister, TW, Sparling, MB, Flashman, LA, Guerin, SJ, Mamourian, AC & Saykin, A 2001, 'Differential working memory load effects after mild traumatic brain injury', NeuroImage, vol. 14, no. 5, pp. 1004-1012. https://doi.org/10.1006/nimg.2001.0899
McAllister TW, Sparling MB, Flashman LA, Guerin SJ, Mamourian AC, Saykin A. Differential working memory load effects after mild traumatic brain injury. NeuroImage. 2001;14(5):1004-1012. https://doi.org/10.1006/nimg.2001.0899
McAllister, Thomas W. ; Sparling, Molly B. ; Flashman, Laura A. ; Guerin, Stephen J. ; Mamourian, Alexander C. ; Saykin, Andrew. / Differential working memory load effects after mild traumatic brain injury. In: NeuroImage. 2001 ; Vol. 14, No. 5. pp. 1004-1012.
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