Direct intraarterial wall injection of microparticles via a catheter: A potential drug delivery strategy following angioplasty

Robert L. Wilensky, Keith L. March, David R. Hathaway

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

68 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Local delivery into the arterial wall of medications at high concentrations may evolve as a method to reduce postangioplasty restenosis. However, since the atherosclerotic artery has increased vasa vasorum, medications injected in a fluid state may diffuse out of the arterial wall too quickly to have a therapeutic effect. Thus we evaluated whether microparticles as a model for a particulate microcarrier drug delivery system, injected via a porous balloon catheter, could be retained within the atherosclerotic rabbit femoral arterial wall. Arteries were injected with a 5 μm microparticle suspension for 45 seconds at either 3 or 5 atm of infusion pressure immediately following balloon angioplasty. Arteries were obtained immediately following the procedure or at 1, 3, 7, or 14 days after infusion to evaluate for the presence of retained microparticles. Of 34 arteries, 30 contained retained microparticles, with 21 exhibiting microparticles in the neointimia, 12 in the media, and 25 in the adventitia. Microparticles were retained for as long as 14 days, and there was no difference between the distribution or quantity of microparticles at 3 or 5 atm of infusion pressure. The mode of microparticle distribution probably involved deposition within dissection planes, although evidence for vasa vasorum transport was observed. We hypothesize that biodegradable microparticles could serve as a vehicle for intramural drug delivery in the treatment of restenosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1136-1140
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Heart Journal
Volume122
Issue number4 PART 1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991

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Intra-Arterial Injections
Angioplasty
Catheters
Arteries
Vasa Vasorum
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Pressure
Adventitia
Balloon Angioplasty
Therapeutic Uses
Drug Delivery Systems
Thigh
Dissection
Suspensions
Rabbits

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Direct intraarterial wall injection of microparticles via a catheter : A potential drug delivery strategy following angioplasty. / Wilensky, Robert L.; March, Keith L.; Hathaway, David R.

In: American Heart Journal, Vol. 122, No. 4 PART 1, 1991, p. 1136-1140.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wilensky, Robert L. ; March, Keith L. ; Hathaway, David R. / Direct intraarterial wall injection of microparticles via a catheter : A potential drug delivery strategy following angioplasty. In: American Heart Journal. 1991 ; Vol. 122, No. 4 PART 1. pp. 1136-1140.
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