Discrepancy index relative to age, sex, and the probability of completing treatment by one resident in a 2-year graduate orthodontics program

Sean M. Schafer, Gerardo Maupome, George J. Eckert, W. Eugene Roberts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: The American Board of Orthodontics' discrepancy index (DI) was designed to objectively quantify the complexity of a malocclusion before orthodontic treatment. In this study, we assessed the influence of age and sex on the DI distribution of a large mixed sample of patients. An additional objective was to ascertain the effectiveness of the DI for predicting the probability that 1 resident can complete the treatment of the malocclusion in a 24-month residency. Methods: A group of 6 calibrated investigators independently determined the DI scores for 716 consecutive patients in the permanent dentition from the patient pool of Indiana University's graduate orthodontics program over 7 years. The DI was scored and compared with the patient's sex and age, and it was noted whether the patient was transferred to a second resident when the first one graduated. Results: The DI is not significantly related to sex or age, but it was a significant predictor for patients who required transfer to a second resident for completion of treatment. Conclusions: The DI was a relatively stable index for measuring malocclusion complexity. It is independent of sex or age but is a consistent indicator of the greater time and effort required to complete treatment, because of the significant correlation to the necessity to transfer patient care to a second resident.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)70-73
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
Volume139
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthodontics

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