Disease recurrence after orthotopic liver transplantation

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

With the advent of cyclosporine immunosuppression in the late 1970s, liver transplantation became a widespread modality for the treatment of end-stage liver disease. Several metabolic disorders that produce liver injury, such as Wilson's disease and alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, are cured by liver transplantation. However, many other diseases for which transplantation is undertaken may recur in the allograft. As follow-up increases and newer diagnostic modalities become available, those diseases that recur, and their natural histories, are becoming better understood. This new information may lead to a reevaluation of the suitability of some conditions for transplantation. This article briefly reviews disease recurrence in orthotopic liver transplants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)292-301
Number of pages10
JournalSeminars in Diagnostic Pathology
Volume10
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 1993

Fingerprint

Liver Transplantation
Recurrence
Transplantation
alpha 1-Antitrypsin Deficiency
Hepatolenticular Degeneration
End Stage Liver Disease
Liver
Natural History
Immunosuppression
Cyclosporine
Allografts
Transplants
Wounds and Injuries
Therapeutics
Autosomal Recessive alpha-1-Antitrypsin Deficiency

Keywords

  • hepatitis
  • Liver
  • malignancy
  • primary biliary cirrhosis
  • transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Medical Laboratory Technology

Cite this

Disease recurrence after orthotopic liver transplantation. / Cummings, O. W.

In: Seminars in Diagnostic Pathology, Vol. 10, No. 4, 01.12.1993, p. 292-301.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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