Disparities in the surgical management of women with Stage I breast cancer

Windy Olaya, Jan H. Wong, John W. Morgan, Sharmila Roy-Chowdhury, Sharon S. Lum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We sought to evaluate factors influencing the choice of surgery for women with early-stage breast cancer. Between 1996 and 2005, 47,837 women who were diagnosed with Stage I breast cancer underwent partial (PM) or total mastectomy (TM) in the California Cancer Registry. A total of 72.8 per cent of women underwent PM. Those treated in the most recent 5-year period were more likely to undergo PM than in the prior 5 years (76.5 vs 69.5%, P <0.0001). PM rates increased with increasing socioeconomic status (SES): 65.1 per cent of patients in the lowest SES quintile underwent PM versus 77.2 per cent in the highest SES quintile (P <0.0001). Forty- to 64-year-old women were more likely to receive PM compared with their older and younger counterparts (74.5 vs 71.2 and 67.0%, respectively; P <0.0001). Asian/Pacific Islander women were least likely to undergo PM (64.0%), whereas non-Hispanic black women were most likely to undergo PM (75.0%) (P <0.0001). On multivariate analysis, these demographic factors remained independent predictors of surgical treatment. PM rates have increased over time; however, significant differences in surgical management exist among women of different race/ethnic groups, ages, and SES. Further research is required to elucidate modifiable factors that impact the choice of surgery for women with early-stage breast cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)869-872
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume75
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Breast Neoplasms
Social Class
Simple Mastectomy
Segmental Mastectomy
Ethnic Groups
Registries
Multivariate Analysis
Demography
Research
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Olaya, W., Wong, J. H., Morgan, J. W., Roy-Chowdhury, S., & Lum, S. S. (2009). Disparities in the surgical management of women with Stage I breast cancer. American Surgeon, 75(10), 869-872.

Disparities in the surgical management of women with Stage I breast cancer. / Olaya, Windy; Wong, Jan H.; Morgan, John W.; Roy-Chowdhury, Sharmila; Lum, Sharon S.

In: American Surgeon, Vol. 75, No. 10, 10.2009, p. 869-872.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Olaya, W, Wong, JH, Morgan, JW, Roy-Chowdhury, S & Lum, SS 2009, 'Disparities in the surgical management of women with Stage I breast cancer', American Surgeon, vol. 75, no. 10, pp. 869-872.
Olaya W, Wong JH, Morgan JW, Roy-Chowdhury S, Lum SS. Disparities in the surgical management of women with Stage I breast cancer. American Surgeon. 2009 Oct;75(10):869-872.
Olaya, Windy ; Wong, Jan H. ; Morgan, John W. ; Roy-Chowdhury, Sharmila ; Lum, Sharon S. / Disparities in the surgical management of women with Stage I breast cancer. In: American Surgeon. 2009 ; Vol. 75, No. 10. pp. 869-872.
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