Distal urinary acidification from Homer Smith to the present

Stephen L. Gluck, Masahiro Iyori, L. Shannon Holliday, Tatiana Kostrominova, Beth S. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Since Smith's time, the essential role of collecting duct intercalated cells in controlling net acid excretion has been recognized. Rather than employing an H+-exchange mechanism, intercalated cells have V-ATPase on the plasma membrane and in plasmalemma-associated tubulovesicles, which functions in the bicarbonate reabsorption, regeneration, and bicarbonate secretion required for acid-base homeostasis. Several distinct mechanisms participate in regulating V-ATpase-driven H+ secretion in different cell types: (1) Renal epithelial cells have the capacity to express different structural forms of V-ATPase that have intrinsic differences in their enzymatic properties. 2) The kidney produces cytosolic regulatory proteins, capable of interacting directly with the V-ATPase, that may modify its activity. V-ATPases in different cell types may differ in the degree to which their activity is affected by regulatory factors, as a result of variations in V-ATPase structure. (3) In the α intercalated cell, the number of active V-ATPases on the luminal membrane is controlled in vivo by membrane vesicle-mediated traffic that may require unidentified mediators. In the β intercalated cell, the number of active V-ATPases on the basolateral membrane may be controlled by regulated assembly and disassembly, responding directly to extracellular pH.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1660-1664
Number of pages5
JournalKidney International
Volume49
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Adenosine Triphosphatases
Bicarbonates
Membranes
Cell Count
Kidney
Acids
Proton-Translocating ATPases
Regeneration
Homeostasis
Epithelial Cells
Cell Membrane
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

Cite this

Gluck, S. L., Iyori, M., Holliday, L. S., Kostrominova, T., & Lee, B. S. (1996). Distal urinary acidification from Homer Smith to the present. Kidney International, 49(6), 1660-1664.

Distal urinary acidification from Homer Smith to the present. / Gluck, Stephen L.; Iyori, Masahiro; Holliday, L. Shannon; Kostrominova, Tatiana; Lee, Beth S.

In: Kidney International, Vol. 49, No. 6, 1996, p. 1660-1664.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gluck, SL, Iyori, M, Holliday, LS, Kostrominova, T & Lee, BS 1996, 'Distal urinary acidification from Homer Smith to the present', Kidney International, vol. 49, no. 6, pp. 1660-1664.
Gluck SL, Iyori M, Holliday LS, Kostrominova T, Lee BS. Distal urinary acidification from Homer Smith to the present. Kidney International. 1996;49(6):1660-1664.
Gluck, Stephen L. ; Iyori, Masahiro ; Holliday, L. Shannon ; Kostrominova, Tatiana ; Lee, Beth S. / Distal urinary acidification from Homer Smith to the present. In: Kidney International. 1996 ; Vol. 49, No. 6. pp. 1660-1664.
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