Distractive flexion cervical spine injuries

A clinical spectrum

Mark Dekutoski, Aaron Cohen-Gadol

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Distractive flexion (DF) injuries of the cervical spine have long been referred to in the literature as perched, subluxed, or dislocated facet injuries. Formal recognition and distinction of distractive flexion and compression flexion injuries of the cervical spine originated from the mechanistic, clock-face classification first put forth by Drucker et al. in the late 1970s (1). This clock-face representation was further popularized with a subclassification by Allen and Ferguson (2). They describe a continuum of osseous and ligamentous injury that comprises the clinical spectrum of injuries illustrated in their paper as hyperflexion sprains, unilateral facet dislocations, bilateral facet dislocations, and complete-fracture dislocations. The classic article (2) described 165 cervical injuries, including 61 cases of distractive flexion injuries. On the clock-face diagram, these injuries occur with the force vector in the 9:00 to 11:30 direction (Fig. 1). Stages of injury or phylogenes are described. Understanding the pathoanatomical basis of each phylogeny is very helpful in defining the injury and deciding treatment options.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationFractures of the Cervical, Thoracic, and Lumbar Spine
PublisherCRC Press
Pages191-205
Number of pages15
ISBN (Electronic)9780824743970
ISBN (Print)9780824707132
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Spine
Wounds and Injuries
Sprains and Strains
Phylogeny

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Dekutoski, M., & Cohen-Gadol, A. (2002). Distractive flexion cervical spine injuries: A clinical spectrum. In Fractures of the Cervical, Thoracic, and Lumbar Spine (pp. 191-205). CRC Press.

Distractive flexion cervical spine injuries : A clinical spectrum. / Dekutoski, Mark; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron.

Fractures of the Cervical, Thoracic, and Lumbar Spine. CRC Press, 2002. p. 191-205.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Dekutoski, M & Cohen-Gadol, A 2002, Distractive flexion cervical spine injuries: A clinical spectrum. in Fractures of the Cervical, Thoracic, and Lumbar Spine. CRC Press, pp. 191-205.
Dekutoski M, Cohen-Gadol A. Distractive flexion cervical spine injuries: A clinical spectrum. In Fractures of the Cervical, Thoracic, and Lumbar Spine. CRC Press. 2002. p. 191-205
Dekutoski, Mark ; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron. / Distractive flexion cervical spine injuries : A clinical spectrum. Fractures of the Cervical, Thoracic, and Lumbar Spine. CRC Press, 2002. pp. 191-205
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