Distribution and correlation of pancreatic gland size and duct diameters on MRCP in patients without evidence of pancreatic disease

Qiushi Wang, Jordan Swensson, Maoqing Hu, Enming Cui, Temel Tirkes, Samuel G. Jennings, M. Akisik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To use MRCP to investigate age-related changes and gender differences of the pancreas and to correlate pancreatic gland size and duct diameter. Methods: In this institutional review, board-approved, HIPAA-compliant study, 280 patients (age 20–88 years) without a history of pancreatic or liver disease who had undergone MRI/MRCP from 2004 to 2015 were identified. The anteroposterior size and main duct diameter of the pancreatic head, body, and tail were measured. The pancreatic gland and duct sizes were compared between genders, and among seven age subgroups (20–29, 30–39, 40–49, 50–59, 60–69, 70–79, 80–89). Results: The pancreatic head and body were significantly larger in males than females (head, p < 0.01; body, p = 0.03), while the tail and the duct diameters of the pancreatic head, body, and tail showed no gender difference. As the age of male participants increased, there was an associated increase in size of the pancreatic gland initially (largest at age 50–59 (body) and 60–69 (head)), followed by subsequent decline in size thereafter. Additionally, the pancreatic duct diameter was found to increase gradually. In females, the size of the pancreatic gland decreased, while the diameter of the pancreatic duct increased with age. Moderate positive correlation for gland size and strong positive correlation for duct diameter among different pancreatic regions were found. Weak negative correlation was found between gland size and duct diameter. Conclusions: There are gender differences in the gland size of the pancreatic head and body. The pancreatic gland size increases until the sixth decade in males, with a more continuous decrease in gland size with age in females. Both males and females demonstrate a marked decrease in gland size after the eighth decade. The duct diameter increases with age in both males and females.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)967-975
Number of pages9
JournalAbdominal Radiology
Volume44
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2019

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Pancreatic Diseases
Pancreatic Ducts
Head
Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act
Research Ethics Committees
Liver Diseases
Pancreas

Keywords

  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Main pancreatic duct
  • MR cholangiopancreatography
  • Pancreatic gland

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Gastroenterology
  • Urology

Cite this

Distribution and correlation of pancreatic gland size and duct diameters on MRCP in patients without evidence of pancreatic disease. / Wang, Qiushi; Swensson, Jordan; Hu, Maoqing; Cui, Enming; Tirkes, Temel; Jennings, Samuel G.; Akisik, M.

In: Abdominal Radiology, Vol. 44, No. 3, 01.03.2019, p. 967-975.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, Qiushi ; Swensson, Jordan ; Hu, Maoqing ; Cui, Enming ; Tirkes, Temel ; Jennings, Samuel G. ; Akisik, M. / Distribution and correlation of pancreatic gland size and duct diameters on MRCP in patients without evidence of pancreatic disease. In: Abdominal Radiology. 2019 ; Vol. 44, No. 3. pp. 967-975.
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abstract = "Purpose: To use MRCP to investigate age-related changes and gender differences of the pancreas and to correlate pancreatic gland size and duct diameter. Methods: In this institutional review, board-approved, HIPAA-compliant study, 280 patients (age 20–88 years) without a history of pancreatic or liver disease who had undergone MRI/MRCP from 2004 to 2015 were identified. The anteroposterior size and main duct diameter of the pancreatic head, body, and tail were measured. The pancreatic gland and duct sizes were compared between genders, and among seven age subgroups (20–29, 30–39, 40–49, 50–59, 60–69, 70–79, 80–89). Results: The pancreatic head and body were significantly larger in males than females (head, p < 0.01; body, p = 0.03), while the tail and the duct diameters of the pancreatic head, body, and tail showed no gender difference. As the age of male participants increased, there was an associated increase in size of the pancreatic gland initially (largest at age 50–59 (body) and 60–69 (head)), followed by subsequent decline in size thereafter. Additionally, the pancreatic duct diameter was found to increase gradually. In females, the size of the pancreatic gland decreased, while the diameter of the pancreatic duct increased with age. Moderate positive correlation for gland size and strong positive correlation for duct diameter among different pancreatic regions were found. Weak negative correlation was found between gland size and duct diameter. Conclusions: There are gender differences in the gland size of the pancreatic head and body. The pancreatic gland size increases until the sixth decade in males, with a more continuous decrease in gland size with age in females. Both males and females demonstrate a marked decrease in gland size after the eighth decade. The duct diameter increases with age in both males and females.",
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T1 - Distribution and correlation of pancreatic gland size and duct diameters on MRCP in patients without evidence of pancreatic disease

AU - Wang, Qiushi

AU - Swensson, Jordan

AU - Hu, Maoqing

AU - Cui, Enming

AU - Tirkes, Temel

AU - Jennings, Samuel G.

AU - Akisik, M.

PY - 2019/3/1

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N2 - Purpose: To use MRCP to investigate age-related changes and gender differences of the pancreas and to correlate pancreatic gland size and duct diameter. Methods: In this institutional review, board-approved, HIPAA-compliant study, 280 patients (age 20–88 years) without a history of pancreatic or liver disease who had undergone MRI/MRCP from 2004 to 2015 were identified. The anteroposterior size and main duct diameter of the pancreatic head, body, and tail were measured. The pancreatic gland and duct sizes were compared between genders, and among seven age subgroups (20–29, 30–39, 40–49, 50–59, 60–69, 70–79, 80–89). Results: The pancreatic head and body were significantly larger in males than females (head, p < 0.01; body, p = 0.03), while the tail and the duct diameters of the pancreatic head, body, and tail showed no gender difference. As the age of male participants increased, there was an associated increase in size of the pancreatic gland initially (largest at age 50–59 (body) and 60–69 (head)), followed by subsequent decline in size thereafter. Additionally, the pancreatic duct diameter was found to increase gradually. In females, the size of the pancreatic gland decreased, while the diameter of the pancreatic duct increased with age. Moderate positive correlation for gland size and strong positive correlation for duct diameter among different pancreatic regions were found. Weak negative correlation was found between gland size and duct diameter. Conclusions: There are gender differences in the gland size of the pancreatic head and body. The pancreatic gland size increases until the sixth decade in males, with a more continuous decrease in gland size with age in females. Both males and females demonstrate a marked decrease in gland size after the eighth decade. The duct diameter increases with age in both males and females.

AB - Purpose: To use MRCP to investigate age-related changes and gender differences of the pancreas and to correlate pancreatic gland size and duct diameter. Methods: In this institutional review, board-approved, HIPAA-compliant study, 280 patients (age 20–88 years) without a history of pancreatic or liver disease who had undergone MRI/MRCP from 2004 to 2015 were identified. The anteroposterior size and main duct diameter of the pancreatic head, body, and tail were measured. The pancreatic gland and duct sizes were compared between genders, and among seven age subgroups (20–29, 30–39, 40–49, 50–59, 60–69, 70–79, 80–89). Results: The pancreatic head and body were significantly larger in males than females (head, p < 0.01; body, p = 0.03), while the tail and the duct diameters of the pancreatic head, body, and tail showed no gender difference. As the age of male participants increased, there was an associated increase in size of the pancreatic gland initially (largest at age 50–59 (body) and 60–69 (head)), followed by subsequent decline in size thereafter. Additionally, the pancreatic duct diameter was found to increase gradually. In females, the size of the pancreatic gland decreased, while the diameter of the pancreatic duct increased with age. Moderate positive correlation for gland size and strong positive correlation for duct diameter among different pancreatic regions were found. Weak negative correlation was found between gland size and duct diameter. Conclusions: There are gender differences in the gland size of the pancreatic head and body. The pancreatic gland size increases until the sixth decade in males, with a more continuous decrease in gland size with age in females. Both males and females demonstrate a marked decrease in gland size after the eighth decade. The duct diameter increases with age in both males and females.

KW - Magnetic resonance imaging

KW - Main pancreatic duct

KW - MR cholangiopancreatography

KW - Pancreatic gland

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JO - Abdominal Radiology

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